What's your Favorite Cut - Filet Mignon, Ribeye or Top Sirloin

MoeDude

LIVE FREE OR DIE!
Have never tried the Jap cuts. I do enjoy Sushi.
Kobe beef is some of the most tender beef you can eat. First time I ever had it was as an appetizer in New York. The small bites of meat were $30/piece and that was back in the 1990s. I had it again when I was on a business trip to Kobe, Japan. Pretty wonderful cut of beef.

Funny story about the dinner in Japan. I ordered prawns and beef at a Japanese style steak house. Well I didn't know the prawn was going to be alive when they threw on the grill in front of me. LOL
 

Zunardo

Well-known member
Funny story about the dinner in Japan. I ordered prawns and beef at a Japanese style steak house. Well I didn't know the prawn was going to be alive when they threw on the grill in front of me. LOL
That must have been, uh, interesting to watch. Did it taste any different, being that fresh? I suppose it's no worse than knowing your lobster was thrown alive into a boiling pot just minutes earlier.
 

USA70PP

Well-known member
About 30 years ago the wife and I were in Monterey. She was teaching Russian at the Defense Language Institute. One little hole in the wall restaurant we liked was in Chualar. This was south of Salinas and the population doubled on Saturday night when a four person band was there. You went to the back and picked the steak you wanted. The special was a 48 oz prime rib. The wife never had one that size but I did and it was great. While we were in Monterey a British couple we knew from Berlin came to visit. We went to Chualar one Saturday. They couldn't believe the restaurant. Julie and my wife had a smaller cut, but Gerry and I each had a 48 ouncer. It was a great night and they mentioned it for years after they had returned to Cheltenham. They were also amazed at the redwoods and enjoyed the cable cars in San Francisco. All in all a good visit. To top it off was the graduation of my wife from the Monterey Institute with her master's degree in the teaching of Russian. The school has since changed names to the Middlebury something or other.
 

Gulliotine

Well-known member
My in-laws just sold their place that was close by cranberries.
I guess the young fellow (30's?) who owned Cranberry's got killed a month or so ago on a golf cart at 2:00am! Life is too short to live locked down.

It may be for sale. Excellent Reuben sandwich btw.
 

bob99

Well-known member
About 30 years ago the wife and I were in Monterey. She was teaching Russian at the Defense Language Institute. One little hole in the wall restaurant we liked was in Chualar. This was south of Salinas and the population doubled on Saturday night when a four person band was there. You went to the back and picked the steak you wanted. The special was a 48 oz prime rib. The wife never had one that size but I did and it was great. While we were in Monterey a British couple we knew from Berlin came to visit. We went to Chualar one Saturday. They couldn't believe the restaurant. Julie and my wife had a smaller cut, but Gerry and I each had a 48 ouncer. It was a great night and they mentioned it for years after they had returned to Cheltenham. They were also amazed at the redwoods and enjoyed the cable cars in San Francisco. All in all a good visit. To top it off was the graduation of my wife from the Monterey Institute with her master's degree in the teaching of Russian. The school has since changed names to the Middlebury something or other.
Russia, Russia, Ruissa. Just can't get away from it!:p
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
About 30 years ago the wife and I were in Monterey. She was teaching Russian at the Defense Language Institute. One little hole in the wall restaurant we liked was in Chualar. This was south of Salinas and the population doubled on Saturday night when a four person band was there. You went to the back and picked the steak you wanted. The special was a 48 oz prime rib. The wife never had one that size but I did and it was great. While we were in Monterey a British couple we knew from Berlin came to visit. We went to Chualar one Saturday. They couldn't believe the restaurant. Julie and my wife had a smaller cut, but Gerry and I each had a 48 ouncer. It was a great night and they mentioned it for years after they had returned to Cheltenham. They were also amazed at the redwoods and enjoyed the cable cars in San Francisco. All in all a good visit. To top it off was the graduation of my wife from the Monterey Institute with her master's degree in the teaching of Russian. The school has since changed names to the Middlebury something or other.
48 ouncer? Goodness. Talk about meat sweats.

That story gave my flashbacks to The Great Outdoors and the "Ole' 96er."

1610810763618.png
 

thavoice

Well-known member
About 30 years ago the wife and I were in Monterey. She was teaching Russian at the Defense Language Institute. One little hole in the wall restaurant we liked was in Chualar. This was south of Salinas and the population doubled on Saturday night when a four person band was there. You went to the back and picked the steak you wanted. The special was a 48 oz prime rib. The wife never had one that size but I did and it was great. While we were in Monterey a British couple we knew from Berlin came to visit. We went to Chualar one Saturday. They couldn't believe the restaurant. Julie and my wife had a smaller cut, but Gerry and I each had a 48 ouncer. It was a great night and they mentioned it for years after they had returned to Cheltenham. They were also amazed at the redwoods and enjoyed the cable cars in San Francisco. All in all a good visit. To top it off was the graduation of my wife from the Monterey Institute with her master's degree in the teaching of Russian. The school has since changed names to the Middlebury something or other.
Chualar still there?
I might be flying into Monterey in a couple of weeks.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
About 30 years ago the wife and I were in Monterey. She was teaching Russian at the Defense Language Institute. One little hole in the wall restaurant we liked was in Chualar. This was south of Salinas and the population doubled on Saturday night when a four person band was there. You went to the back and picked the steak you wanted. The special was a 48 oz prime rib. The wife never had one that size but I did and it was great. While we were in Monterey a British couple we knew from Berlin came to visit. We went to Chualar one Saturday. They couldn't believe the restaurant. Julie and my wife had a smaller cut, but Gerry and I each had a 48 ouncer. It was a great night and they mentioned it for years after they had returned to Cheltenham. They were also amazed at the redwoods and enjoyed the cable cars in San Francisco. All in all a good visit. To top it off was the graduation of my wife from the Monterey Institute with her master's degree in the teaching of Russian. The school has since changed names to the Middlebury something or other.
No kidding, paying hundreds for steak? I do not get it. To each their own money, not for me to judge.

I'll have luxery on occasion, sure. Hundred dollar meal, sure. Couple times a year, maybe. I'd rather put my money into a flight to places luxery costs a fraction and I can meet some people. Same meat, same cooking, washington's instead of benjamins. Best fish I've had to date, and I'm a Lake Erie guy, was a couple dollar eyes looking at me good'ol American trout from Lake Titicaca. The lake was cleaner then... more Titi, less caca. Another was a back alley in Africa, I'd asked a cabbie where I could get a cheap bite to eat. Some sort of fish soup I'll never get to have again.

Best beef? Yeah, can never be sure it's actually "beef" but that would be Africa again, pennies for French or Senegalese cooking. Best crustacian? Bahrain (not exacty 3rd world), they practically pay you. Here, prawns and a liter of gas and $20 US to take it off my hands. And hitting the Balkans when they were recovering from war and trying to jump start the tourist industry? Ate AMAZING shell food, surrounded by marble in Dubrovnik; some Bosnian (me thinking gangsta) insisted on paying for our whole group. Even in Japan. I forget what those little local hot spots are called for the hoy pollie. Kind of like tapas, foreigners get eye-balled but you pick little bits of sea food, they cook on the spot.

Travel is the way to eat.
 
Last edited:

thavoice

Well-known member
No kidding, paying hundreds for steak? I do not get it. To each their own money, not for me to judge.

I'll have luxery on occasion, sure. Hundred dollar meal, sure. Couple times a year, maybe. I'd rather put my money into a flight to places luxery costs a fraction and I can meet some people. Same meat, same cooking, washington's instead of benjamins. Best fish I've had to date, and I'm a Lake Erie guy, was a couple dollar eyes looking at me good'ol American trout from Lake Titicaca. The lake was cleaner then... more Titi, less caca.

Best beef? Yeah, can never be sure it's actually "beef" but that would be Africa, again, pennies for French cooking. Best crustacian? Bahrain (not exacty 3rd world), they practically pay you. Here, prawns and a liter of gas and $20 US to take it off my hands.
Not much beats sitting overseeing the Nile and eating the Whole Fish (believe it was the Tilapia Nile) and drinking a Nile Special beer at sunset......
but I digress...
 

USA70PP

Well-known member
No kidding, paying hundreds for steak? I do not get it. To each their own money, not for me to judge.

I'll have luxery on occasion, sure. Hundred dollar meal, sure. Couple times a year, maybe. I'd rather put my money into a flight to places luxery costs a fraction and I can meet some people. Same meat, same cooking, washington's instead of benjamins. Best fish I've had to date, and I'm a Lake Erie guy, was a couple dollar eyes looking at me good'ol American trout from Lake Titicaca. The lake was cleaner then... more Titi, less caca. Another was a back alley in Africa, I'd asked a cabbie where I could get a cheap bite to eat. Some sort of fish soup I'll never get to have again.

Best beef? Yeah, can never be sure it's actually "beef" but that would be Africa again, pennies for French or Senegalese cooking. Best crustacian? Bahrain (not exacty 3rd world), they practically pay you. Here, prawns and a liter of gas and $20 US to take it off my hands. And hitting the Balkans when they were recovering from war and trying to jump start the tourist industry? Ate AMAZING shell food, surrounded by marble in Dubrovnik; some Bosnian (me thinking gangsta) insisted on paying for our whole group. Even in Japan. I forget what those little local hot spots are called for the hoy pollie. Kind of like tapas, foreigners get eye-balled but you pick little bits of sea food, they cook on the spot.

Travel is the way to eat.
Sat on the ground eating whatever it was the Paki tribesmen had and at an embassy 4th of July do in Kabul. Broke bread with locals in Turkey, Japan, Greece, Italy, Germany, Pakistan, England, Belgium, France, where ever I happened to be. The best is what the locals have. They serve hospitality to go with it.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Sat on the ground eating whatever it was the Paki tribesmen had and at an embassy 4th of July do in Kabul. Broke bread with locals in Turkey, Japan, Greece, Italy, Germany, Pakistan, England, Belgium, France, where ever I happened to be. The best is what the locals have. They serve hospitality to go with it.
(y)
I REALLY want to do some village hopping through the Stans. I wanna sleep in a yurt. Probably past the time to accomplish it though. My stay in Turkey was too short and relegated to Istanbul to have any appreciation. Lucky you.

Japan was a trip. I was hitch hiking. People wanted to feed me things I couldn't afford. Not that killer fish. Fruit. Individually wrapped pears. I guess they wrap them on the tree. You had those? Largest grapes I've ever seen. I did get to try that Kobe but really don't have the taste buds to appreciate I think.

On a rural hike by myself (stupid in it's own right) in New Guinea some little boy sidled up, was going to protect me as is custom and responsibility. He shinnied up a tree, hacked open a coconut. My first taste of baby coconut. Oh my. That was the first desert war. I think I still have the newspaper announcing the end with the headline, "ol iraki army runaway."

Hitched a ride on an Indonesian cargo ship through the South China Sea. They had lines dragging and actually caught a tuna. They were shocked as they never really caught anything. (bone breaker too if not careful unhooking). They shared out. THAT's the stuff the Japanese pay fortune for. I admit, if I was rich enough that cost was to me like going to McDonalds, I might lose my sense of economy. Besides that meal it was five days of rice and roaches. Roaches weren't part of the menu, just frequent guests on the plate.

Not much beats sitting overseeing the Nile and eating the Whole Fish (believe it was the Tilapia Nile) and drinking a Nile Special beer at sunset......
but I digress...
That's another place I want to get to but probably past time. I had two shots at Eastern Africa. When in the Middle East and when in Western Africa. Medical cut both out of the game just before I was to have a leave. Morocco, Senegal, the Nile and what was supposed to be my original posting but the war happened the week I was supposed to get on the plane, Ruanda. Really would like to see those. Uh, on topic, i hear they have great filet mignon in Ruanda... tastes like snake.
 
Last edited:

USA70PP

Well-known member
(y)
I REALLY want to do some village hopping through the Stans. I wanna sleep in a yurt. Probably past the time to accomplish it though. My stay in Turkey was too short and relegated to Istanbul to have any appreciation. Lucky you.

Japan was a trip. I was hitch hiking. People wanted to feed me things I couldn't afford. Not that killer fish. Fruit. Individually wrapped pears. I guess they wrap them on the tree. You had those? Largest grapes I've ever seen. I did get to try that Kobe but really don't have the taste buds to appreciate I think.

On a rural hike by myself (stupid in it's own right) in New Guinea some little boy sidled up, was going to protect me as is custom and responsibility. He shinnied up a tree, hacked open a coconut. My first taste of baby coconut. Oh my. That was the first desert war. I think I still have the newspaper announcing the end with the headline, "ol iraki army runaway."

Hitched a ride on an Indonesian cargo ship through the South China Sea. They had lines dragging and actually caught a tuna. They were shocked as they never really caught anything. (bone breaker too if not careful unhooking). They shared out. THAT's the stuff the Japanese pay fortune for. I admit, if I was rich enough that cost was to me like going to McDonalds, I might lose my sense of economy. Besides that meal it was five days of rice and roaches. Roaches weren't part of the menu, just frequent guests on the plate.



That's another place I want to get to but probably past time. I had two shots at Eastern Africa. When in the Middle East and when in Western Africa. Medical cut both out of the game just before I was to have a leave. Morocco, Senegal, the Nile and what was supposed to be my original posting but the war happened the week I was supposed to get on the plane, Ruanda. Really would like to see those. Uh, on topic, i hear they have great filet mignon in Ruanda... tastes like snake.
At 80 years old, my adventures were 30 to 60 years ago. As Yogi said, when you come to a fork in the road take it. Can't say I'd have done anything differently. Life has been good to me.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
How could I forget?
Wife brought home left over Prime Rib from Texas Roadhouse last night.

Had it for lunch today.


Delicious
 

Indiandad

Well-known member
Assuming you all are including prime rib in ribeye category but either and filet are head and shoulders above anything.

I usually grill but have mastered the cast iron skillet on the stovetop this winter w/ oil and they're coming out GREAT.
You realize prime rib is the primal that ribeye is cut from, don't you?
 

OldSoulon

Well-known member
Best steak I ever had was a bone in ribeye in New Orleans, at a restaurant where you sat at picnic tables.

That being said, it's hard to find a REALLY good one. And you have to be ready to trim it as you eat it.

Always medium rare for me.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Sirloin isn't even a steak.

It's made from the top butt which is cheap roast meat.
I googled for understanding. Sure are a lot of recipes for "sirloin steak." So there's a difference? I figured if you put beef in an oven it was a roast and if you cooked it on a grill it was a steak. Learn something new everyday.
 
.
Top