What schools do you think should or eventually will consolidate?

WJ-OSU-STEELERS

Active member
I think if schools dips below graduating 80 kids per class, they should look at consolidation with another school(s) district but consolidating isn't always the best thing. I believe former Presidential Candidate Ross Perot said it best, it is better to have 4 high schools with 500 kids (9 thru 12) than to have 1 high school with 2,000 kids. The economies of scale says the one school should be cheaper (1 superintendent, 1 principle, etc) and possibly offer more things such AP classes, resources for kids on IEP's, etc. However, as Perot said the 4 schools means there is 4 valedictorians, 4 class presidents, 4 leads in the school play, 4 starting qb's, 4 starting point guards, etc. What you have is more kids involved and having successes/failures which prepare them for life. No sport prepares one for life like football, having 4 teams means more kids can have this opportunity. Some kids may not even try out for football if their school was 2,000+ kids and they had little to no shot at playing time.
 

jobarules

Active member
I think if schools dips below graduating 80 kids per class, they should look at consolidation with another school(s) district but consolidating isn't always the best thing. I believe former Presidential Candidate Ross Perot said it best, it is better to have 4 high schools with 500 kids (9 thru 12) than to have 1 high school with 2,000 kids. The economies of scale says the one school should be cheaper (1 superintendent, 1 principle, etc) and possibly offer more things such AP classes, resources for kids on IEP's, etc. However, as Perot said the 4 schools means there is 4 valedictorians, 4 class presidents, 4 leads in the school play, 4 starting qb's, 4 starting point guards, etc. What you have is more kids involved and having successes/failures which prepare them for life. No sport prepares one for life like football, having 4 teams means more kids can have this opportunity. Some kids may not even try out for football if their school was 2,000+ kids and they had little to no shot at playing time.
Winner winner chicken dinner
 

Sykotyk

Well-known member
You can still have large districts that just have multiple high schools. In Texas nearly every major city has an ISD with multiple high schools but only one administration and one superintendent.

Each building isn't really the issue. It's multiple duplication of services. Instead of one district buying supplies, one union contract, one supplier for any service, need, etc, you have one county like Trumbull with over a dozen competing districts all wasting money at the administrative level for smaller and smaller schools.
 

OUcats82

Well-known member
A few in the Cincinnati area....

Colerain and Northwest I can see "recombining" when the time comes that their buildings are finally deemed obsolete. Colerain's building is closing in on being 60 and Northwest 50 (NW was opened in the early 70s to accommodate a baby boom in the district). While Colerain is safely in D1, Northwest is D3 in football.

Schools I could see being absorbed sometime in the next 10+ years:

Lockland-infrastructure is old, low tax base, leans on open enrollment. Borders CPS, Reading, Princeton and Wyoming.
New Miami

At one time I envisioned a scenario where Princeton could have absorbed Lockland and Reading to create a Valley High School, Valley School District etc. or just made them part of Princeton.

But since Princeton just recently completed a massive building project, replacing or rehabbing every school and Reading did one of their own, consolidating every school into one campus, I don't think that will happen in my lifetime (or at least not until I am an old man).
 

tmk

Member
New Bremen and Minster are close enough to consolidate as well as St. Henry and Coldwater as well...
That got me thinking about high schools that are unusually close to each other.

I know Waterford and Fort Frye are only about a half mile (and a river) apart from each other "as the crow flies" (a little farther by car, of course); are there any other school systems that have their buildings so unusually close as these two districts?
 

The Dock

Well-known member
That got me thinking about high schools that are unusually close to each other.

I know Waterford and Fort Frye are only about a half mile (and a river) apart from each other "as the crow flies" (a little farther by car, of course); are there any other school systems that have their buildings so unusually close as these two districts?
Briggs (Columbus City) and Franklin Heights (Southwestern City) are a mile and a half from each other. Dublin Scioto and Worthington Kilbourne are about 2 or so miles from each other (the "Battle of Hard Road.") I don't think anyone has Waterford and FF beat, though.
 

wildcat71

Well-known member
Briggs (Columbus City) and Franklin Heights (Southwestern City) are a mile and a half from each other. Dublin Scioto and Worthington Kilbourne are about 2 or so miles from each other (the "Battle of Hard Road.") I don't think anyone has Waterford and FF beat, though.
How far apart are Canton Central Catholic and Perry in Stark county?? I think it's called the battle for 13th street..
 

murphy13

Well-known member
Regardless, consolidation of public school districts will be in Ohio’s future.
It makes no sense that Stark County has 17 school districts. That's millions of dollars going towards administrative waste that could be redirected towards better student/teacher ratios.
 

CedarBuck92

Active member
From just a curiosity standpoint I would like to see what a single school district per county would look like. For some counties it wouldn't be too bad other than busing distance. For others the shear number of students would be astronomical.

Not sure of the accuracy of the data but here is website with some numbers.
 

StateChampion2012

Well-known member
From just a curiosity standpoint I would like to see what a single school district per county would look like. For some counties it wouldn't be too bad other than busing distance. For others the shear number of students would be astronomical.

Not sure of the accuracy of the data but here is website with some numbers.
Mercer County would be a disaster.
 

BucksFan937

Well-known member
I think if schools dips below graduating 80 kids per class, they should look at consolidation with another school(s) district but consolidating isn't always the best thing. I believe former Presidential Candidate Ross Perot said it best, it is better to have 4 high schools with 500 kids (9 thru 12) than to have 1 high school with 2,000 kids. The economies of scale says the one school should be cheaper (1 superintendent, 1 principle, etc) and possibly offer more things such AP classes, resources for kids on IEP's, etc. However, as Perot said the 4 schools means there is 4 valedictorians, 4 class presidents, 4 leads in the school play, 4 starting qb's, 4 starting point guards, etc. What you have is more kids involved and having successes/failures which prepare them for life. No sport prepares one for life like football, having 4 teams means more kids can have this opportunity. Some kids may not even try out for football if their school was 2,000+ kids and they had little to no shot at playing time.
Only because I was in a graduating class of 78 kids, I feel like commenting on this. This is right at the cutoff number you listed for when schools should think about consolidating. I think the number should be around 50. There are a lot of great school districts that graduate under 80 kids and there are no issues with numbers, in any sports, and there are a lot of great traditions. I'm not just saying this for athletics as well as the fact that the school systems are good as well. Besides that, I do agree with your points about having more schools gives more opportunities for more kids to participate.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
For multiple reasons but that definitely would be near the top.
I am not a fan of all these schools in the last 20 years that have rebuilt outside of their town, where they could get land, and now 100% of the district has to be bussed to school.

SC2012, I hope you realize how spoiled we/ya'll are when it comes to many things, school and park placement being 2 huge aspects. Drive around town in the AM and you see hundreds of kids walking and biking to school and that is gone for so many places that have rebuilt miles outside of town.
Granted, some things just worked out very luckily for us in Buzzards Glory, and man is it just a perfect set up.
 

BirdDog10

Active member
SHOULD??
Ottoville / Fort Jennings in Putnam county. 3 and a half miles divide the schools. Now its worth pointing out that neither has football BUT with their powers combined they COULD field a team....maybe.

Miller City / Continental, again in Putnam county. Not as close as the above mentioned (8 mile divide between Miller City and Continental) BUT still close enough IMO. Again neither has a football team but could field a team.

Kalida and Columbus Grove COULD merge although Grove has no issues fielding athletic teams especially football BUT Kalida to Grove is no further than Miller City to Continental.

In short Putnam county is ripe to be consolidated. Always has been, always will be but WON'T.
The only way any of these schools ever merge is if one of them goes completely defunct and has no choice. Grove and Kalida is by far the most far-fetched. Both are excellent schools with no reason to merge with one another except to bring in revenue and cut costs, and if Grove was hurting that bad for revenue, Pandora-Gilboa HS is a 5-minute drive from CGHS. And just like with the other scenarios, hell would freeze over before that happens 😂

When you look at sports only, yes, many Putnam County schools seem like they should merge with otheres, but look outside of sports. Every school in Putnam County is consistently ranked among the top schools in the state, sometimes the country for their size; they almost all have new(ish) buildings that are going to last a long time, and the communities that support them all are amazing, tight-knit communities that produce good kids that are very successful after high school every single year. The only other county I know of that you can compare Putnam to is Mercer County, and we've all had our turns hearing about them on this site.
 

BirdDog10

Active member
New Bremen and Minster are close enough to consolidate as well as St. Henry and Coldwater as well...
If we're saying that every Putnam County school should consolidated, then agreed, but no one thinks about Mercer County needing to consolidate because they have successful sports teams :rolleyes: Take sports out of it and Putnam County and Mercer County schools are very similar
 

Rangerfan

Active member
I am not a fan of all these schools in the last 20 years that have rebuilt outside of their town, where they could get land, and now 100% of the district has to be bussed to school.

SC2012, I hope you realize how spoiled we/ya'll are when it comes to many things, school and park placement being 2 huge aspects. Drive around town in the AM and you see hundreds of kids walking and biking to school and that is gone for so many places that have rebuilt miles outside of town.
Granted, some things just worked out very luckily for us in Buzzards Glory, and man is it just a perfect set up.
Sometimes they had little choice, but I agree wholeheartedly. It is alway fun to watch all the home construction that surrounds a new school building in a small town so that kids can walk to school. Two prime examples right now are Fort Loramie and New Bremen. As soon as the school went in, that area became the epicenter for new home construction in those towns.
 

Rangerfan

Active member
I also remember back in the day at my college engineering courses. All the kids from the "bigger" school districts seemed to be further along than the Mercer, Auglaize and Shelby county kids, but come graduation day 5 years later, when only one third of those who started survived, all those small school kids where still there to pick up their degrees.
 
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