What places have gone out of business because of Covid-19 that you would have returned to once the pandemic is done?

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
With the light at the end of this long Covid-19 tunnel, we should be getting back to somewhat normal this Summer. What businesses that you enjoyed pre-pandemic have shutdown operations, never to re-open?
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
none. Not that I've had reason to notice anyhow. I would think a business owner that has many other businesses to work with would be more affected but as someone whose only needs are food, staples, medical, car and house repair the answer would be "none." None of the restaurants I frequent, none of the stores I frequent. Just the opposit so I'm told. Monies have been pumping in.

Real economy or fake? I don't know. But they say money has been coming in.
 

ogealbhain

Well-known member
With the light at the end of this long Covid-19 tunnel, we should be getting back to somewhat normal this Summer. What businesses that you enjoyed pre-pandemic have shutdown operations, never to re-open?
2 restaurants near me (Indian and Italian).....3 other restaurants near me but did not frequent.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
The short answer is none.

I haven't heard that anywhere near and dear to my heart has closed, but my pre-pandemic life didn't involve going out and about too often. I'd meet a group of friends for dinner each Tues, and that was about it for dining. Those places are still around, AFAIK. The places I shopped at are still around. There are also some businesses that I started frequenting more during the pandemic and will continue to do so. For example, my home improvement store preference has shifted to Menard's even though it's farther away than either Home Depot or Lowe's.

My local bike shop has done even better since the pandemic began, maybe too good as they got inundated with repair jobs through the summer and early fall. Also, the bike industry in general is still having a tough time with the demand of many common items (entry level bikes, parts, tools, etc.) well ahead of production. Last weekend, my dad inquired about a specific pair of brake pads for 1 of his bikes, and the local shop said they may not get another shipment for a couple months. It took trips to 2 other shops before he found them.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
The short answer is none.

I haven't heard that anywhere near and dear to my heart has closed, but my pre-pandemic life didn't involve going out and about too often. I'd meet a group of friends for dinner each Tues, and that was about it for dining. Those places are still around, AFAIK. The places I shopped at are still around. There are also some businesses that I started frequenting more during the pandemic and will continue to do so. For example, my home improvement store preference has shifted to Menard's even though it's farther away than either Home Depot or Lowe's.

My local bike shop has done even better since the pandemic began, maybe too good as they got inundated with repair jobs through the summer and early fall. Also, the bike industry in general is still having a tough time with the demand of many common items (entry level bikes, parts, tools, etc.) well ahead of production. Last weekend, my dad inquired about a specific pair of brake pads for 1 of his bikes, and the local shop said they may not get another shipment for a couple months. It took trips to 2 other shops before he found them.
recreational vehicles in general so it appears. A friends was looking before this to get a midsize RV. I suggested now might be a good time, with business down, price might be down. I was corrected.
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
Some locals (Akron area):
Kirbie's Meats- nice butcher shop
Louie's Bar & Grill- great old bar and grill for wings and burgers
BARFs Small Engine Repair- family small engine place than kept all of my stuff running
 

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
Retro Dog in Cuyahoga Falls closed in the Fall. We usually went there a couple times a year. Good food and atmosphere.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Prov1 will be here telling us that the shutdown was great for businesses and we should continue
He'd be lying to say otherwise for many segments. I don't see a single shuttered business in this low to mid economic neighborhood and none that weren't on the way out anyhow, mostly because owners getting older with no one to take over or a natural victim of a changing economy even before covid.

There are always victims of change. Most having nothing to do with the covid or government response to it.

Covid accelerated the already happening change to remote purchasing, leading to a quicker uptic in jobs in logistics and communications. All the poor conserviclone whiners getting their narratives from a pod-caster counting their clicks had no faith in the resilience of our people. A resilience that's been under their radars because they're apparently too comfortable in their positions and did not see the change that happens everyday, every year. They were too busy worrying about masks, lol Of course several will tell you, well I knew Mericans would adjust but look at their last March posts? lol, crybabies.

We'll be fine. Ignoring this pandemic as a hoax as these frauds wanted to do is what would have devsstated the economy for a long time. For a hopefully once in a lifetime threat, we still could have responded better and saved many.

We'll recover better than we responded.
 

scbuckeye99

Well-known member
With the light at the end of this long Covid-19 tunnel, we should be getting back to somewhat normal this Summer. What businesses that you enjoyed pre-pandemic have shutdown operations, never to re-open?
College roommate is the economic development director for the city of St. Marys, Ohio. He said not a single business in the community had to close down during these last 12 months during covid. Not that I live in St. Marys but if I did i'd say None.
 

Tesoro

Well-known member
He'd be lying to say otherwise for many segments. I don't see a single shuttered business in this low to mid economic neighborhood and none that weren't on the way out anyhow, mostly because owners getting older with no one to take over or a natural victim of a changing economy even before covid.

There are always victims of change. Most having nothing to do with the covid or government response to it.

Covid accelerated the already happening change to remote purchasing, leading to a quicker uptic in jobs in logistics and communications. All the poor conserviclone whiners getting their narratives from a pod-caster counting their clicks had no faith in the resilience of our people. A resilience that's been under their radars because they're apparently too comfortable in their positions and did not see the change that happens everyday, every year. They were too busy worrying about masks, lol Of course several will tell you, well I knew Mericans would adjust but look at their last March posts? lol, crybabies.

We'll be fine. Ignoring this pandemic as a hoax as these frauds wanted to do is what would have devsstated the economy for a long time. For a hopefully once in a lifetime threat, we still could have responded better and saved many.

We'll recover better than we responded.
lol... your still following junk science I see. When is the earth going to end?
 

Tesoro

Well-known member
College roommate is the economic development director for the city of St. Marys, Ohio. He said not a single business in the community had to close down during these last 12 months during covid. Not that I live in St. Marys but if I did i'd say None.
Yup... nor did they voluntarily close.
 

Tesoro

Well-known member
Here something that people aren’t seeing... steel prices have doubled because of the closings... lumber prices have increased to make a normal ranch house cost 16 grand more.. the pain is coming..
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
A couple things that covid has probably done away with for good...

Salad bars and buffets. I always appreciated a good salad bar.

Movie theaters. Curious to see if they rebound? I love attending a movie and grabbing a big tub of popcorn. Mostly due to nostalgia. Younger folks today would rather just stream everything and never got the experience part of the big screen. Probably was heading down that path anyway but covid certainly didn't help.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
lol... your still following junk science I see. When is the earth going to end?
that was economics. So far, nearly every person here has said "none" and I don't think anyone has said proof positive it was the response to the pandemic that closed a business they frequent as opposed to the many other factors that businesses close. Why you would dispute the resilience of the people in this country is beyond me but If you can dispute a stated fact, then do it. Why be such a coward?
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Here something that people aren’t seeing... steel prices have doubled because of the closings... lumber prices have increased to make a normal ranch house cost 16 grand more.. the pain is coming..
In what way are we not seeing it? It's all over the news with various people trying to spin it according to their own personal politics as caused by anything but the market. Was it covid caused lumber prices to soar in 2017? Was it a vaccine that caused them to crash back down in 2018? Or was it in response to home supply and demand? Hint: pick c.

Chicken Little, maybe support your claims with some facts and economic law then maybe we can agree or agree to disagree.
 

Tesoro

Well-known member
In what way are we not seeing it? It's all over the news with various people trying to spin it according to their own personal politics as caused by anything but the market. Was it covid caused lumber prices to soar in 2017? Was it a vaccine that caused them to crash back down in 2018? Or was it in response to home supply and demand? Hint: pick c.



Chicken Little, maybe support your claims with some facts and economic law then maybe we can agree or agree to disagree.
seeing that I’m in the steel industry and deal and talk directly to mills... I think I have a good handle on the cause of the steel price increase. But here.. let me help ya. There were nearly 3 months last year that the steel mills were running at severe reduced production or not running at all. For months the automobile industry was running in reduced production. Now... automotive companies are ordering steel at a rate 30 percent of what they historically order to increase production.

lumber prices have increased due to limited production of pine in Canada. It’s not because of an increase in construction.
 

Tesoro

Well-known member
And if what you are saying is true... which it isn’t. We have had to saddle an additional 4 trillion dollars of debt on our children to do it. Huge cost.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
seeing that I’m in the steel industry and deal and talk directly to mills... I think I have a good handle on the cause of the steel price increase. But here.. let me help ya. There were nearly 3 months last year that the steel mills were running at severe reduced production or not running at all. For months the automobile industry was running in reduced production. Now... automotive companies are ordering steel at a rate 30 percent of what they historically order to increase production.

lumber prices have increased due to limited production of pine in Canada. It’s not because of an increase in construction.
I do not doubt your experience, I value that over getting information from podcasters. But, You never stated and supported a cause for the price changes (or skipping a step, for the reduced production) nor disputed the ones I mentioned. 🤷

Reduced production is a business decision due to either reduced demand or over-warehoused because of over-production (simply). Connect that to your cause.

You added the following parenthetical but the pronoun wasn't clear. How can something I said occurred have an effect on the economy, if it didn't happen?
And if what you are saying is true... which it isn’t. We have had to saddle an additional 4 trillion dollars of debt on our children to do it. Huge cost.
 
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Tesoro

Well-known member
I do not doubt your experience, I value that over getting information from podcasters. But, You never stated and supported a cause for the price changes (or skipping a step, for the reduced production) nor disputed the ones I mentioned. 🤷

Reduced production is a business decision due to either reduced demand or over-warehoused because of over-production (simply). Connect that to your cause.

You added the following parenthetical but the pronoun wasn't clear. How can something I said occurred have an effect on the economy, if it didn't happen?
You claimed that the shutdown had no affect on the economy. And I said....if the economy wasn't affected it was because we put 4 trillion dollars of debt on the backs of our kids to prevent it. Yes..reduced production is a business decision. You can only stock so much steel. You can't keep it outdoors. Its a needed business decision.
 

hubman

Well-known member
Not sure if it was Covid or other issues, but I am sad to see that Ruth's Chris that had recently opened in downtown Cleveland has now shuttered.
 

Orin Swift

Well-known member
Not sure if it was Covid or other issues, but I am sad to see that Ruth's Chris that had recently opened in downtown Cleveland has now shuttered.
It's okay Hubman. Ruth's Chris is decent but there's plenty of other steak houses that are superior.
 
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