What’s the pay for a high school football head coach?

CJK84

Well-known member
I have no reason to start this thread other than curiosity. My guess is that head coaches (and their assistants) are greatly underpaid throughout the state and across the country. I know they put in dozens of hours each week - maybe 35-40 hours for a head coach.

So what’s the pay, for example, for a small school hc? Is it considerably greater at a D2 or D1 school?
 

CJK84

Well-known member
And does a coach see any pay during the season - or must he wait until Nov or even the end of the school year?
 

bcw

Active member
3K-4K at small schools and then on up from there. I am guessing, but would say the average is in the 6-10K range for the stipend. Obviously a few of the big programs are offering more, but it might be more about the other "stipends" or jobs they are given in the district.

Some schools pay 3-4 times per season, some pay all at the end of the season.
 

bcw

Active member
We figured it up not too long ago and the number of hours for organized football activities (practice, games, game planning at school, weight room, and miscellaneous) was about 600 hours for the calendar year. That wasn't including anything that wasn't structured or scheduled. Those hours add up quick.
 

CJK84

Well-known member
I guess I hadn’t even thought of the considerable offseason commitments. Dang - their pay might be below minimum wage when all of it is taken into account.

So might the highest paid coach make 12k as his football salary?
 

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
That’s chicken feed. Warren Harding’s coach was making just under 100K back in the early 2000’s. They paid big to compete with the big boys.
 

bcw

Active member
I have no doubt that Harding is paying well, but I'm assuming the 100K isn't just a football stipend? Study Hall monitor or some other easy job tied with it?
 

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
I have no doubt that Harding is paying well, but I'm assuming the 100K isn't just a football stipend? Study Hall monitor or some other easy job tied with it?
You are partially correct. His football take was $70,000. He was then named to a newly-formed position called Director of Athletics. Possibly meaning he would assist the Athletic Director lol. Like just a made-up job to funnel him an additional $20,000. Most people rolled their eyes when hearing of it.

Actually, though, that job entailed supervision of all other sports below the HS level. It would have alleviated some of the AD’s workload. Interestingly enough, the new D of A position was eliminated after that coach left.
 

bucksman

Moderator
Scholastic coaches (head/assistant) are on supplemental contracts, which vary in rate by district.

Depending on the school district, hired coaches may pick up a teaching job and/or other job within the district, or they may be employed in the private sector.

Many districts (I know at least the one where I coach at in a different sport) will pay coaches twice in a season. One-half of the supplemental in the middle of the season, and the other half of the supplemental when all in-season duties are completed (after the last game, and uniforms/equipment are turned in, etc)
 
I guess I hadn’t even thought of the considerable offseason commitments. Dang - their pay might be below minimum wage when all of it is taken into account.

So might the highest paid coach make 12k as his football salary?
Well below minimum wage...pennies on the hour in most small school settings. Typically paid at half way point and at the end of year has been my past experience
 

Stirred not Shaken

Well-known member
Successful coach can parlay his success into either a better paying job at the school ( i.e. principal job ) or to a bigger school and more pay ( Moore started at little Minster now at Massillon ).
 

Stirred not Shaken

Well-known member
You are partially correct. His football take was $70,000. He was then named to a newly-formed position called Director of Athletics. Possibly meaning he would assist the Athletic Director lol. Like just a made-up job to funnel him an additional $20,000. Most people rolled their eyes when hearing of it.

Actually, though, that job entailed supervision of all other sports below the HS level. It would have alleviated some of the AD’s workload. Interestingly enough, the new D of A position was eliminated after that coach left.
How many state titles did Harding win with that investment ?
 

Indiandad

Well-known member
..and you were still overpaid.

Sorry, was too easy.
Nobody coaches at the high school level or lower to get rich.

Most do it for love of the game.

I had the Fortune to assist a great coach (fastest to 100 wins in school history, highest win percentage in school history) who did it for the love of the kids. He constantly talked about how the gym was the extension of the classroom. It was our Responsibility it teach the game to every kid, not just the best players. Every kid mattered. We never cut a player even when the AD brought a list of names to us and demanded these kids be cut because they just weren't very good.

Some coach for ego, but they usually don't last long. Kids don't generally work hard for egotistical coaches.

My first 3 coaching jobs were all "volunteer" positions at small schools. This included a head coaching position that was unpaid.
I vowed to play every kid in every game in the first half. My AD told me I was nuts and that I'd be crucified by the fans because I wasn't "playing to win".
We won at a 92% clip in my tenure of 7 seasons.... including a State tournament appearance.

I actually had a parent offer me a sizable amount of money after the season when they realized I was coaching for free.
I turned it down and suggested he donate it to a charity.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Nobody coaches at the high school level or lower to get rich.

Most do it for love of the game.

I had the Fortune to assist a great coach (fastest to 100 wins in school history, highest win percentage in school history) who did it for the love of the kids. He constantly talked about how the gym was the extension of the classroom. It was our Responsibility it teach the game to every kid, not just the best players. Every kid mattered. We never cut a player even when the AD brought a list of names to us and demanded these kids be cut because they just weren't very good.

Some coach for ego, but they usually don't last long. Kids don't generally work hard for egotistical coaches.

My first 3 coaching jobs were all "volunteer" positions at small schools. This included a head coaching position that was unpaid.
I vowed to play every kid in every game in the first half. My AD told me I was nuts and that I'd be crucified by the fans because I wasn't "playing to win".
We won at a 92% clip in my tenure of 7 seasons.... including a State tournament appearance.

I actually had a parent offer me a sizable amount of money after the season when they realized I was coaching for free.
I turned it down and suggested he donate it to a charity.
Know the struggle......did it for free for Nealy ten years, giving up vacation time and non paid days off so yeah I know the long struggles. All is with it years later when they still call ya coach and get invited to graduations and their weddings.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
Scholastic coaches (head/assistant) are on supplemental contracts, which vary in rate by district.

Depending on the school district, hired coaches may pick up a teaching job and/or other job within the district, or they may be employed in the private sector.

Many districts (I know at least the one where I coach at in a different sport) will pay coaches twice in a season. One-half of the supplemental in the middle of the season, and the other half of the supplemental when all in-season duties are completed (after the last game, and uniforms/equipment are turned in, etc)
Even that can vary. Many places I know of pay a lump sum at the end of the season (same for announcer, statistician, equipment manager, etc), but I know of at least 1 school where if the coach is employed in some other capacity at the school, then the stipend is spread out over the course of the year. If the coach is not employed in the building, then the stipend is paid in a lump sum.

A swim coach near me asked his school board if they would be willing to spread out his pay over the course of the year. They could not do it, so he had to resign. He could no longer afford to keep waiting until the end of the season for 1 big check, especially with all the pay he was losing at his day job from having to constantly leave work early to coach the swim team.
 

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
How many state titles did Harding win with that investment ?
Warren only got a state title runner up in 2002, as you obviously know.

However, WGH did get their most successful coach ever in term of most wins, most playoff game appearances, most playoff wins, highest winning %, most D1 college players produced...just off the top of my head. I’d say the endeavor was a success despite falling just short of a state title. That’s just my own opinion, though. Some may disagree.

But...that coach helped put Warren football back on the map after an 11-year stretch of not making the playoffs. The hiring of that coach also put WGH in 15 playoff games in seven years. Prior to that coach, WGH had played in 6 playoff games in 29 years.
 
Last edited:

cincifbfan

Well-known member
Many public coaching salaries can be found here - http://tos.ohio.gov/Teacher_Salary/-any-/-any-/-any-/-any-/-any-/-any-/-any-

Just select a name and a year.

Remember there could also be perks involved, such as use of a vehicle and others.
I have never heard of a public coach getting use of a car.

All public schools coaches contracts are part of the teacher's collective bargaining agreement. They can't just arbitrarily give someone a car. All collective bargaining agreements can be found here: https://serb.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/serb/documents-and-decisions/collective-bargaining-agreements/collective-bargaining-agreements

Feel free to peruse and find out how much the head coach stipend is for your school. Now, perks may be they get additional stipends for weight room supervisor or something else. Whoever said that Warren G. Harding paid that much just to coach football is simply not true. They can't just pay someone that much to only coach football, it's in the CBA.
 

Mackinbiner

Well-known member
I have never heard of a public coach getting use of a car.

All public schools coaches contracts are part of the teacher's collective bargaining agreement. They can't just arbitrarily give someone a car. All collective bargaining agreements can be found here: https://serb.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/serb/documents-and-decisions/collective-bargaining-agreements/collective-bargaining-agreements

Feel free to peruse and find out how much the head coach stipend is for your school. Now, perks may be they get additional stipends for weight room supervisor or something else. Whoever said that Warren G. Harding paid that much just to coach football is simply not true. They can't just pay someone that much to only coach football, it's in the CBA.
You're referring to official pay from the school district. I contend coaches can be remunerated in other ways. Boosters, fans, and supporters can be very influential in sweetening the pot to attract a coach.
 

scbuckeye99

Well-known member

Starting pay for HFC in my district is about $9,500.00 That's with ZERO years as a HFC. It progresses from there to a second and then a final third tier. Three years ago the district approved performance compensation for all coaches who make the playoffs in their respective sport. It's only a couple extra hundred bucks but its better than nothing.

My school district does not allow HFC to double up with AD. SOME get an Asst. AD stipend to sweeten the pot. Depending on your building principal you might get a light teaching load or you might be SOL depending on your teaching area.

Keep in mind in South Carolina we have spring ball (which is a joke fyi) so your season as a football coach really begins in early May and runs til at minimum late October / early November.
 
.
Top