Varsity Girls and Varsity Boys Same Night, Same Location

tcgobucks

Well-known member
Our HS has 3 locker rooms. 1 is for our girls teams, 1 for the boys and 1 for visiting teams (JV and Varsity). Not sure what they would do if the visitors had a boys and girls team that obviously needed separate locker rooms instead of JV and Varsity teams that can use the same locker room
 

scbuckeye99

Well-known member
I would be very interested to see the logistics of this. Did they have multiple gyms setup?
According to their WR coach they had mats rolled up, ready to go upon girls bball completion, got things rolled out, taped, upon completion tore down, rolled mats back up and boys bball game commenced.

and yes I'm sure the logistics made for an interesting evening.
 

psavitt05

Active member
pre-covid, like maybe 2018 or 2019, a school in my district even did a night where they played a girls varsity bball game, followed by a varsity wrestling dual and then capped off by a boys varsity bball game. The same school was the opponent for all 3 contests. Was a LONG night I was told but successful in showcasing all of 3 sports.
How long does a wrestling dual usually take compared to a varsity or JV basketball game?
 

CedarBuck92

Well-known member
Our HS has 3 locker rooms. 1 is for our girls teams, 1 for the boys and 1 for visiting teams (JV and Varsity). Not sure what they would do if the visitors had a boys and girls team that obviously needed separate locker rooms instead of JV and Varsity teams that can use the same locker room
I do think this could be a sticking point at a lot of schools. I know my HS has 2 locker rooms in the Varsity Gym. There are 2 more in the Auxiliary Gym but would require the visiting teams to walk a bit farther to get to the their locker room.
 

14Red

Well-known member
I'm not sure why this would be attractive at all? Why would you cut the gate, even a small one doing this. Look there are alot of ways to "get around" the truth. But the truth is, IN GENERAL, people are not going to go see girls games unless they have an attachment (relative, child, close friend). No matter how many ways you slice it, it's just not reality.
Smaller colleges tried this years ago with mens/ women's doubleheaders. First year, women first/ then men. They of course they flipped it so men first, then women. Result, gym mostly full for men's games, mostly empty for women. Now they do the women first all the time and by the middle of the second half, there is a decent crowd for the women's game - as opposed to having them last and people walking out during the game and finishing in a mostly empty gym.
We just keep pounding this Title IX stuff and it's not reality.
 

Philly_Cat

Well-known member
PA does their state championship games in a similar format. For example, the first day would be boys A, girls AA, boys AAA, girls AAAA. Then the 2nd day would be girls A, boys AA, girls AAA, boys AAAA. I honestly always liked that format. Gave me the opportunity to watch girls play when I probably wouldn't have on my own. Plus it was the highest quality girls basketball the state had to offer, so it made it more enjoyable to watch.
 

14Red

Well-known member
In the "ain't broke - don't fix it" world, why monkey around with all this??? Doesn't the current boys JV/ boys varsity one night, girls JV/ girls varsity work just fine in most situations???
 

The Dock

Well-known member
In the "ain't broke - don't fix it" world, why monkey around with all this??? Doesn't the current boys JV/ boys varsity one night, girls JV/ girls varsity work just fine in most situations???
Not when 1) there are less refs, 2) there are less kids signing up to play. The logistics and efficiencies of reserve games being the traditional prelude to the varsity contest have become obsolete at many places. Mores have also frankly shifted as well — place more of a premium on the varsity contests you have. Boys and girls. The nature of reserve competition, and how you make it happen, is changing.

Schools are learning to adapt, and they’re becoming more efficient in their operations in the process.
 

14Red

Well-known member
Not when 1) there are less refs, 2) there are less kids signing up to play. The logistics and efficiencies of reserve games being the traditional prelude to the varsity contest have become obsolete at many places. Mores have also frankly shifted as well — place more of a premium on the varsity contests you have. Boys and girls. The nature of reserve competition, and how you make it happen, is changing.

Schools are learning to adapt, and they’re becoming more efficient in their operations in the process.
If your school does not have a JV team for boys or girls I could see it, but that's so few. I would think the schools would be more interested in enticing kids to play, not pushing them away.

So is there an upcharge with two varsity game? Or one ticket gets you in for both games at the cost of one?
 

Philly_Cat

Well-known member
If your school does not have a JV team for boys or girls I could see it, but that's so few. I would think the schools would be more interested in enticing kids to play, not pushing them away.

So is there an upcharge with two varsity game? Or one ticket gets you in for both games at the cost of one?
In my opinion, fan enthusiasm and more butts in the seats overall for both games should trump any loss in ticket money. At the end of the day it's about the kids, and school and community engagement, not money.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
If your school does not have a JV team for boys or girls I could see it, but that's so few.
Not quite. In my area, there are reserve games that are cut to two quarters of play. Even the larger schools have started to eschew from “freshmen only” to JV ‘A’ and JV ‘B.’ Many mid-to-small schools are only having one reserve boys’ team and they can’t make a full-slate girls’ reserve team work.

One thing that took off in the 1-2 season saga of COVID was reserve matchmaking with schools that didn’t have an originally scheduled varsity billing. A boys program could be playing two different schools in the same night across the different levels; there’s also one-off scheduling where a school will play an out-of-conference in a reserve contest only and that’s the only hosted competition for the day. Common scheduling practice in baseball and volleyball.
I would think the schools would be more interested in enticing kids to play, not pushing them away.
ok, this is an odd “thought” to have. Do you actually think schools are telling kids to not play? What?!?

The changes in scheduling practices, where they exist, are here to stay. It’s a function of participation numbers and referee supply. It may end up becoming more common, even with larger schools, across the state entirely. It comes at the cost of siloing the reserve games onto their own days, but frankly it’s a small price to pay. The days of boys’ reserve games being as, if not more, prioritized as (than) girls’ varsity games are starting to erode — not just out of simple necessity but also general attitudes.
 

14Red

Well-known member
Not quite. In my area, there are reserve games that are cut to two quarters of play. Even the larger schools have started to eschew from “freshmen only” to JV ‘A’ and JV ‘B.’ Many mid-to-small schools are only having one reserve boys’ team and they can’t make a full-slate girls’ reserve team work.

One thing that took off in the 1-2 season saga of COVID was reserve matchmaking with schools that didn’t have an originally scheduled varsity billing. A boys program could be playing two different schools in the same night across the different levels; there’s also one-off scheduling where a school will play an out-of-conference in a reserve contest only and that’s the only hosted competition for the day. Common scheduling practice in baseball and volleyball.

ok, this is an odd “thought” to have. Do you actually think schools are telling kids to not play? What?!?

The changes in scheduling practices, where they exist, are here to stay. It’s a function of participation numbers and referee supply. It may end up becoming more common, even with larger schools, across the state entirely. It comes at the cost of siloing the reserve games onto their own days, but frankly it’s a small price to pay. The days of boys’ reserve games being as, if not more, prioritized as (than) girls’ varsity games are starting to erode — not just out of simple necessity but also general attitudes.
I certainly understand the issues that lack of numbers present, and the official shortage.
My remedy for the officials is to go back to the 2 person varsity games. The extra official was supposed to clean the game up and that's obviously not happened.
Unfortunately too we've demonized freshmen and JV games to the point that if kids aren't playing varsity as freshmen, they quit. I would begin to propose this. The biggest complaint we see from kids about basketball is the season is too long. You basically do basketball 6 days a week for nearly 4 months. I'd cut a practice or two out of the schedule each week and really encourage more participation. Yes the skills will erode some but I'd rather have 15-20 players than 10-12. I do think this is completely different from big city schools to rural schools. The rural schools are smaller, but they seem to have a better chance of attracting players, retaining players and having great, not good crowds. Big city schools always struggle to get people to come to games because there are just more things to do.
 

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
So is there an upcharge with two varsity game? Or one ticket gets you in for both games at the cost of one?
One ticket for both games. Since I go to both the boys and girls, I can say that there is almost no overlap between the two fanbases. Basically, they collected the same amount of money if the games had been on different nights.

Other thoughts, it was a great atmosphere for both games. Best for both this season. The JV players that did not dress varsity were there for the game. The officials also did both games. That might be standard but not sure since it was my first game with this format. I have seen one JV ref also stay and do a varsity game this year a couple of times. That is the first time I've ever seen a ref do JV and Varsity on the same night and chalk it up to ref shortage.
 

14Red

Well-known member
One ticket for both games. Since I go to both the boys and girls, I can say that there is almost no overlap between the two fanbases. Basically, they collected the same amount of money if the games had been on different nights.

Other thoughts, it was a great atmosphere for both games. Best for both this season. The JV players that did not dress varsity were there for the game. The officials also did both games. That might be standard but not sure since it was my first game with this format. I have seen one JV ref also stay and do a varsity game this year a couple of times. That is the first time I've ever seen a ref do JV and Varsity on the same night and chalk it up to ref shortage.
Talked to a ref on a Saturday night, he'd done a jr. high game in the morning, a girls high school game in the afternoon and a boys high school game at night. I think we need to pull back to two varsity officials per game, and these schools have to up the pay for officials, and big thing is we need to stop treating officials like dirt, that's from fans, players to coaches. Sportsmanship at the high school level is as bad as I've seen it.
 
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