Patrick Day dies of brain injuries 4 days after knockout

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
Junior middleweight Patrick Day, who suffered a 10th-round knockout loss on Saturday night, died from brain injuries on Wednesday at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, promoter Lou DiBella said. Day was 27.

"On behalf of Patrick's family, team, and those closest to him, we are grateful for the prayers, expressions of support and outpouring of love for Pat that have been so obvious since his injury," DiBella said in a statement. "He was a son, brother, and good friend to many. Pat's kindness, positivity, and generosity of spirit made a lasting impression with everyone he met."
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
I love boxing. That being said, I think the promoter summed it up pretty well: "It becomes very difficult to explain away or justify the dangers of boxing at a time like this."
 

El Indio

Well-known member
I never understood the sport of boxing or the other types of fighting that everyone watches on tv. It's a barbarian sport that I want no part of.
 

Auggie

Well-known member
One thing about MMA is that you can tap out, with boxing its up to the ref to decide when the fight is over or the corner can throw in the towel which is very rare.
 

Gardens35

Well-known member
That's mostly true Auggie, but I've seen several mma bouts where a fighter is unconscious while on the mat and still takes full bore shots to the head until the refs gets there to stop it.

Either way, I just SMH at those who sign up for dane bramage.

Choices.
 

Crusaders

Moderator
Haven’t seen video of the fight but from what I’ve read, the bad part of the knock out wasn’t so much the getting KO’d, but how he landed on his head.

You hate to this type of thing for sure, but it is very rare still. In the thousands upon thousands of fights per year deaths almost never happen, and even in the deaths, the cause isn’t always directly boxing related but an underlying health issue.

People have always sought entertainment in combat sport. It’s just part of human nature. I don’t think it is barbaric if fighters are voluntarily stepping into the ring.
 

NewOldBlood

Active member
I typically enjoy combat sports. I think what makes these deaths so shocking, even though they are rare, is that you just don't see that happen at the professional level in any other sports. Other than Dale Earnhardt, I can't remember another athlete dying during competition in any of the other professional sports. I guess at the end of the day, these guys go in knowing that it is part of the deal. It doesn't make it any less tragic and I think that combat sports have improved the officiating and pull the trigger faster on stoppages so that this doesn't happen, but unfortunately it still part of the "game".
 

arizonawildcat

Well-known member
I typically enjoy combat sports. I think what makes these deaths so shocking, even though they are rare, is that you just don't see that happen at the professional level in any other sports. Other than Dale Earnhardt, I can't remember another athlete dying during competition in any of the other professional sports. I guess at the end of the day, these guys go in knowing that it is part of the deal. It doesn't make it any less tragic and I think that combat sports have improved the officiating and pull the trigger faster on stoppages so that this doesn't happen, but unfortunately it still part of the "game".
Ray Chapman says hello.
 

Auggie

Well-known member
Ray Chapman says hello.
Not only did batters not wear helmets back then but completely different rules governing pitching pre Chapman death. Pitchers could dirty up the ball so it was dull and tough to see, they could also scuff it up so they could get a better grip for spinning pitches, and the spitter was still legal. Because of the Chapman tragedy batters started to wear helmets and all the rules governing the ball and types of pitches allowed changed. This is not the first death as a result from a ring beating, what rules changes has boxing done to improve conditions?
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
Boxing has done very little. I guess you could point to shorter championship fights since Duk Ku Kim died against Mancini. Also, I think the refs are quicker to step in and end a fight than they were years ago. Also, medical staff is more readily available. I'm not sure any of these make much of a difference though. Anything that would would also likely materially change the sport.
 

winbypin

Well-known member
I typically enjoy combat sports. I think what makes these deaths so shocking, even though they are rare, is that you just don't see that happen at the professional level in any other sports. Other than Dale Earnhardt, I can't remember another athlete dying during competition in any of the other professional sports. I guess at the end of the day, these guys go in knowing that it is part of the deal. It doesn't make it any less tragic and I think that combat sports have improved the officiating and pull the trigger faster on stoppages so that this doesn't happen, but unfortunately it still part of the "game".
Dale is probably the most famous in recent memory but motor sports is pretty dangerous it looks like.

 
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