Ohio Track & Field History - Robert King - 1924 Class A High Jump Champion & 1928 Olympic Champion

JAVMAN83

Well-known member
I saw this little tidbit on Track & Field News regarding the 1924 Ohio Class A High Jump Champion, Robert King, of Lima Central HS. He had won the Class A title in 1924 with a jump of 6' 1 1/2", and was tied for 3rd in 1923. Robert went on to win the 1928 Olympic Championships with a jump of 6' 4". He also won the NCAA title for Stanford in 1928 as part of their winning NCAA team that year.


 

JAVMAN83

Well-known member
Said he was born and then died in California, what led him to Ohio for HS?
That I do not know. I suspect if someone were to do some research at the public library in Lima from that era, that information might be acquired. There are SOOOOO MANY stories to write about in Ohio Track & Field History that would be enjoyable reads.
 

Piman58

Member
The 1900 US Census shows that King's family lived in Indiana and his father worked as a traveling salesman for Standard Oil. Robert's older brother and sister were both born in Indiana. The 1910 census finds the family living in Lima with young Robert now present and born in California. Father is now a traveling salesman for a cigar factory.Robert's father was born in Allen county in 1870. So perhaps after a breif time working for Standard Oil in California, the grwoing family returned to familiar Allen county to settle.The 1920 census has Robert's father still employed in the cigar business.
 
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JAVMAN83

Well-known member
The 1900 US Census shows that King's family lived in Indiana and his father worked as a traveling salesman for Standard Oil. Robert's older brother and sister were both born in Indiana. The 1910 census finds the family living in Lima with young Robert now present and born in California. Father is now a traveling salesman for a cigar factory.Robert's was born in Allen county in 1870. So perhaps after a breif time working for Standard Oil in California, the grwoing family returned to familiar Allen county to settle.The 1920 census has Robert's father still employed in the cigar business.
Interesting. It would make a lot of sense, and I'm sure many people have experienced such variances between where they are born and where they are really "from".
 
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