Ohio State Buckeyes 2019

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
Joey Bosa suspended on a crap targeting call when needed most. Nick Bosa hurt and then bailed. Now this. I sure hope it's only heal-up/rest-up time for Chase Young, to get next year's star DE more reps......
 

Auggie

Well-known member
In the Twitter world it is interesting to see how the Chase Young thing has become more of a cause celeb on how bad the NCAA's rules are and it is time for a change. Of note the lawyer defending Young, Tim Nevius, was an investigator for the NCAA during the Tattoo Gate thing and he became so disgusted that he left the NCAA and got a law degree so he could fight the good fight for the athletes side: https://www.cleveland.com/osu/2014/06/former_ncaa_investigator_tim_n.html

Not sure how genuine this guy is he just creating a practice because he saw a winning cause and could make a buck. Nonetheless the NCAA as we know it is on life support and the days of the student-athlete might be turning into the days of the college age athlete that represents a University.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
So some are saying he borrowed money from a family friend so his family could attend games?
Sounds fishy. Why wouldnt the family just borrow the money and leave him out of it, no harm no foul.
 

cjb56

Well-known member
Ohio State expecting 4 game suspension for Chase Young

Others are claiming the appeal will reduce it to two, which would be perfect.

If it winds up as four, you've probably seen the last of him at OSU. At that point his agent is going to advise him to start preparing for the NFL and not risk injury in college.
 

ELKSONE

GO ELKS!
Others are claiming the appeal will reduce it to two, which would be perfect.

If it winds up as four, you've probably seen the last of him at OSU. At that point his agent is going to advise him to start preparing for the NFL and not risk injury in college.
NCAA are a bunch of crooks
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Others are claiming the appeal will reduce it to two, which would be perfect.

If it winds up as four, you've probably seen the last of him at OSU. At that point his agent is going to advise him to start preparing for the NFL and not risk injury in college.
Four game suspension brings him back for the Big10 Championship and potentially the play-offs. Even as an assured future pro, I don't see what advantage does he gain in giving that up? He could have left anytime this year without risking his draft position. I think he stays as long as the NC is in play. OK, I HOPE he stays as long as the NC is in play.

If not? Next man up.
 

Go Herd

New member
The NCAA needs to get some Back Bone and do the RIGHT Thing.
They NEED to impose a Forfeiture penalty against Ohio State for
playing an ineligible player for the first eight Games. Ohio State must
be held to the same Standard as everyone Else. I will say OSU
is the Best 1- 8 team in the Country. We have teams Forfeiting entire
seasons wins for far less corruption. NCAA Do Your Job.
 

cjb56

Well-known member
The NCAA needs to get some Back Bone and do the RIGHT Thing.
They NEED to impose a Forfeiture penalty against Ohio State for
playing an ineligible player for the first eight Games. Ohio State must
be held to the same Standard as everyone Else. I will say OSU
is the Best 1- 8 team in the Country. We have teams Forfeiting entire
seasons wins for far less corruption. NCAA Do Your Job.
It used to be frowned upon to start drinking before noon.
 

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
So some are saying he borrowed money from a family friend so his family could attend games?
Sounds fishy. Why wouldnt the family just borrow the money and leave him out of it, no harm no foul.
Ikr?!

My initial thoughts as well. No need to be in the middle.

It was his girlfriend. Maybe he wanted to surprise her, or maybe he was just dumb ?
 

Hammerdrill

Well-known member
The NCAA needs to get some Back Bone and do the RIGHT Thing.
They NEED to impose a Forfeiture penalty against Ohio State for
playing an ineligible player for the first eight Games. Ohio State must
be held to the same Standard as everyone Else. I will say OSU
is the Best 1- 8 team in the Country. We have teams Forfeiting entire
seasons wins for far less corruption. NCAA Do Your Job.
Why would borrowing money and paying it back be a violation of any kind? And OSU should tell the NCAA we are only sitting him 1 game.
 

IceDad34

Member
The NCAA needs to get some Back Bone and do the RIGHT Thing.
They NEED to impose a Forfeiture penalty against Ohio State for
playing an ineligible player for the first eight Games. Ohio State must
be held to the same Standard as everyone Else. I will say OSU
is the Best 1- 8 team in the Country. We have teams Forfeiting entire
seasons wins for far less corruption. NCAA Do Your Job.
Go crawl back in your hole- Hater
 

Go Herd

New member
Great Question HammerDrill.
Its called Extra Benefits.
Any D-1 Student Athlete and His or Her parents get a Hand Book that outlines
All the Does and Don'ts.
Chase Young's, Actions clearly meet the NCAA definition of,
Extra Benefits
One area that causes concern and raises the greatest number of questions
involves a student-Athlete or his family member's receipt of a "extra benefit".
An extra benefit is defined as any special arrangement designed to provide
a student-athlete or the student athlete's relatives or friends a benefit not
authorized by the NCAA. The receipt of a benefit not authorized by NCAA regulations
by a student-athlete or his parents, relatives or friends will immediately place the
student- athlete's eligibility for intercollegiate athletics competition in jeopardy.
Parents or student-athletes selling memorabilia can also jeopardize eligibility.
Extra benefit rules apply to both student-athletes and parents.

Examples of extra benefits include, but are not limited to, the following.

1. A loan of money, regardless of temporary nature of loan, intent to pay back
the value, or whom the loan is from (i.e. parents of teammates are not
appropriate persons to offer loans to student-athletes).
2. A special discount, payment arrangement or credit on a purchase
or service (e.g. dry cleaning, legal representation):
3. Free or reduced-cost housing.
4. Transportation, an automobile or use of an automobile.
5.Services (e.g., movie tickets, dinners, use of a car) from commercial
agencies (e.g., movie theaters, restaurants car dealers) without charge
or at reduced rates: and
* Cash, gift certificates or other items with value.
Please contact the Compliance office with questions.

Hammerdrill, Every School in the country gives these kids and parents this base example
of the NCAA rule--* Extra Benefit Claus. Ohio State is not in a position to dictate these basic rules to
the NCAA. The violation occurred sometime within Mr. Young's relationship with
OSU. Now we know he is an eligible player playing in games for Ohio State. Not only
should he sit for the remainder of the year but Ohio State should Forfeit any games in which they Won
and he played since the infraction. Clearly HE WAS Ineligible.
HammerDrill these are the rules.
 
Great Question HammerDrill.
Its called Extra Benefits.
Any D-1 Student Athlete and His or Her parents get a Hand Book that outlines
All the Does and Don'ts.
Chase Young's, Actions clearly meet the NCAA definition of,
Extra Benefits
One area that causes concern and raises the greatest number of questions
involves a student-Athlete or his family member's receipt of a "extra benefit".
An extra benefit is defined as any special arrangement designed to provide
a student-athlete or the student athlete's relatives or friends a benefit not
authorized by the NCAA. The receipt of a benefit not authorized by NCAA regulations
by a student-athlete or his parents, relatives or friends will immediately place the
student- athlete's eligibility for intercollegiate athletics competition in jeopardy.
Parents or student-athletes selling memorabilia can also jeopardize eligibility.
Extra benefit rules apply to both student-athletes and parents.

Examples of extra benefits include, but are not limited to, the following.

1. A loan of money, regardless of temporary nature of loan, intent to pay back
the value, or whom the loan is from (i.e. parents of teammates are not
appropriate persons to offer loans to student-athletes).
2. A special discount, payment arrangement or credit on a purchase
or service (e.g. dry cleaning, legal representation):
3. Free or reduced-cost housing.
4. Transportation, an automobile or use of an automobile.
5.Services (e.g., movie tickets, dinners, use of a car) from commercial
agencies (e.g., movie theaters, restaurants car dealers) without charge
or at reduced rates: and
* Cash, gift certificates or other items with value.
Please contact the Compliance office with questions.

Hammerdrill, Every School in the country gives these kids and parents this base example
of the NCAA rule--* Extra Benefit Claus. Ohio State is not in a position to dictate these basic rules to
the NCAA. The violation occurred sometime within Mr. Young's relationship with
OSU. Now we know he is an eligible player playing in games for Ohio State. Not only
should he sit for the remainder of the year but Ohio State should Forfeit any games in which they Won
and he played since the infraction. Clearly HE WAS Ineligible.
HammerDrill these are the rules.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/sidearm.sites/msubillings.sidearmsports.com/documents/2014/5/16/Parents_NCAA_Guide.pdf

From the NCAA guideline
"Definitions to know & understand:
Extra benefits An extra benefit is any special arrangement by an institutional employee or a representative of the institution's athletics interests to provide a student-athlete or their relatives/friends a benefit not expressly authorized by NCAA legislation. Receipt of a benefit is not a violation if it is demonstrated that the same benefit is generally available to the institution's student body (relatives/friends) determined on a basis unrelated to athletics ability."

Unless the friend was an OSU employee or rep of OSU it shouldn't be a big deal. Evidently we'll find out this week.
 

Zunardo

Well-known member
If it was discussed earlier, I missed it, but how was he able to repay the loan in April? Off-season job? Family member?
 

cjb56

Well-known member
If it was discussed earlier, I missed it, but how was he able to repay the loan in April? Off-season job? Family member?
I gave him the money in exchange for cutting my lawn. He wouldn’t do the trimming, though. He didn’t care much for the weedeater. Looking forward to seeing him demolish State Penn.
 

Zunardo

Well-known member
I gave him the money in exchange for cutting my lawn. He wouldn’t do the trimming, though. He didn’t care much for the weedeater. Looking forward to seeing him demolish State Penn.
Glad to hear it was on the up-and-up!
 

Go Herd

New member
What a Joke. NCAA No better than the main street Media- Fake News.
Full of Hypocrite's and Double Standards. We don't want to upset
the CFP. Its as Bad as the NFL.
 

Gh0st

Well-known member
What a Joke. NCAA No better than the main street Media- Fake News.
Full of Hypocrite's and Double Standards. We don't want to upset
the CFP. Its as Bad as the NFL.
Is it that you don't know the rules? Don't care about the rules? Or just like complaining?
 

Stirred not Shaken

Well-known member
Great Question HammerDrill.
Its called Extra Benefits.
Any D-1 Student Athlete and His or Her parents get a Hand Book that outlines
All the Does and Don'ts.
Chase Young's, Actions clearly meet the NCAA definition of,
Extra Benefits
One area that causes concern and raises the greatest number of questions
involves a student-Athlete or his family member's receipt of a "extra benefit".
An extra benefit is defined as any special arrangement designed to provide
a student-athlete or the student athlete's relatives or friends a benefit not
authorized by the NCAA. The receipt of a benefit not authorized by NCAA regulations
by a student-athlete or his parents, relatives or friends will immediately place the
student- athlete's eligibility for intercollegiate athletics competition in jeopardy.
Parents or student-athletes selling memorabilia can also jeopardize eligibility.
Extra benefit rules apply to both student-athletes and parents.

Examples of extra benefits include, but are not limited to, the following.

1. A loan of money, regardless of temporary nature of loan, intent to pay back
the value, or whom the loan is from (i.e. parents of teammates are not
appropriate persons to offer loans to student-athletes).
2. A special discount, payment arrangement or credit on a purchase
or service (e.g. dry cleaning, legal representation):
3. Free or reduced-cost housing.
4. Transportation, an automobile or use of an automobile.
5.Services (e.g., movie tickets, dinners, use of a car) from commercial
agencies (e.g., movie theaters, restaurants car dealers) without charge
or at reduced rates: and
* Cash, gift certificates or other items with value.
Please contact the Compliance office with questions.

Hammerdrill, Every School in the country gives these kids and parents this base example
of the NCAA rule--* Extra Benefit Claus. Ohio State is not in a position to dictate these basic rules to
the NCAA. The violation occurred sometime within Mr. Young's relationship with
OSU. Now we know he is an eligible player playing in games for Ohio State. Not only
should he sit for the remainder of the year but Ohio State should Forfeit any games in which they Won
and he played since the infraction. Clearly HE WAS Ineligible.
HammerDrill these are the rules.
Most OSU fans me included would say that if Young played for an SEC school no one would have ever even heard about this loan because it would have been swept under the rug. You are right the NCAA is a bunch of hypocrites, take a loan from a freind and you get suspended for 2 games. Should have none.
 
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