Ohio schoolboys who have gone on to break 4 minutes for one mile

More Penn Relays

At the 124th annual Penn Relays Carnival in Philly this weekend, Colby Alexander and America's #1 ranked miler for 2017, Johnny Gregorek, had a neck and neck duel right to the finish in the Roger Bannister Memorial Mile Run with Johnny getting the win, pulling away from Colby in the final 75 meters for the win, 3:54.94 to 3:56.02.

Since they added the Mile Run to the meet in 1929, only 3 winning times have been faster than Colby's runner-up 3:56.02. In 1974, Tony Waldrop set the meet record of 3:53.2, in 1977, Kenya's Wilson Waigwa ran 3:54.04 and Saturday Gregorek ran 3:54.94.

At this point in the outdoor season, according to Track and Field News, Johnny and Colby now own the fastest two outdoor mile times in the world as of April 28th.

This was the season opener for both Colby and Johnny. Pretty good start to the season for both, I'd say!!

The wind, as usual at Penn, wreaked havoc with the runners, with the biggest victim being Jacob Dumford. On a day with less wind, the former Westerville North star's 4:00.00 is easily his first sub 4. Jacob took 5th in a stacked field.
 
Willy fink does it!!!

2012 Maumee grad and Eastern Michigan alum, Willy Fink has become the 27th Ohio schoolboy to go under 4 minutes in the mile. CONGRATS to Willy!

Willy ran 3:59.44 last night at the Wingfoot Mile at Emory University in Atlanta, placing 3rd.

Also running was Ryan Adams (CVCA, Furman U). Ryan placed 6th in a PR 4:01.16.

Ryan and Jacob Dumford (4:00.00) (Westerville North, Notre Dame) are bidding to become #'s 28 & 29!!
 

Rohbino

Well-known member
Perhaps I should have started a different thread for this.

Arjun Jha of TWHS and now at Indiana doesn't belong in this thread yet but I have a feeling that he will earn his place here this upcoming spring. Jha has been running extremely well - both last fall during XC season and this indoor season. Hopefully he will continue his good form into the spring.

This past Saturday at a home meet for the Hooisers, Jha dropped a 4:00.84 to win the mile. Strong work!

 

Rohbino

Well-known member
Didn't CVCA's Ryan Adams run a 3:57 mile last week?
Adams' mile time is currently the #2 time on the NCAA D1 indoor qualifying list that can be found here.

It's crazy how many Northern Arizona runners are on the list. All of those times were at an NAU home meet. NAU is in Flagstaff, AZ and is at nearly 7000' elevation. I looked up the results and the "@" indicates that the times were converted. I am assuming that they were converted from altitude. The times on the qualifying list are 3:58.17, 3:58.69, and 3:59.21. These were converted from 4:07.15, 4:07.68, and 4:08.21. That seems like a big conversion factor. I haven't spent a lot of time at altitude running but I have biked, hiked, skied, and ridden motocross and snowmobiles at altitude and I know it's taxing. Still, though, those conversions seem like a big allowance of time. I did not realize that the NCAA converts times at altitude for the qualifying lists. I was curious about a conversion factor and table and this is all that I could come up with. Does anyone know anything about the NCAA rules regarding qualifying marks from altitude and converting them?
 
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Willy Fink went under a few weeks ago if he was not already on the list. It seems there were a couple of other Ohioans under or close this past indoor season that caught my eye. Can anyone add to the list?
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
Adams' mile time is currently the #2 time on the NCAA D1 indoor qualifying list that can be found here.

It's crazy how many Northern Arizona runners are on the list. All of those times were at an NAU home meet. NAU is in Flagstaff, AZ and is at nearly 7000' elevation. I looked up the results and the "@" indicates that the times were converted. I am assuming that they were converted from altitude. The times on the qualifying list are 3:58.17, 3:58.69, and 3:59.21. These were converted from 4:07.15, 4:07.68, and 4:08.21. That seems like a big conversion factor. I haven't spent a lot of time at altitude running but I have biked, hiked, skied, and ridden motocross and snowmobiles at altitude and I know it's taxing. Still, though, those conversions seem like a big allowance of time. I did not realize that the NCAA converts times at altitude for the qualifying lists. I was curious about a conversion factor and table and this is all that I could come up with. Does anyone know anything about the NCAA rules regarding qualifying marks from altitude and converting them?
Here's an example of the NCAA's altitude allowances. It's from 10 years ago, but it gives you a general idea of how stingy or generous the conversions can be.

They're using a computer program nowadays instead of a chart:

Given how many runners from schools in Colorado qualify to DII Nationals every year, I tend to think the allowances are on the generous side. There are some great programs with great runners at many of those schools, but it borders on ridiculous with how many of them populate the performance lists.

EDIT: I accidentally downloaded the conversion software from the ustfccca website. It's very simple to use.
You pick your city from a drop down menu. The indoor and outdoor altitude info shows up for that city's venues.
You pick your event and enter the time.
You select if it is indoor or outdoor and if you want the performance converted from altitude to sea level or from sea level to altitude. After making all those selections, a converted performance is generated.

To get the altitude converter, go to http://ustfccca.org/infozone/
At the bottom of the page under "Championships Information," click on the 2nd to last link "NCAA Altitude/Track Converter" to download the conversion program.
 
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9/1/20 post #1

UPDATED LIST, AS OF 9/1/20...OHIO SCHOOLBOY MILERS WHO HAVE GONE ON TO BREAK 4 MIN FOR THE MILE


Listed with name, year they first broke 4 min and who they ran for when they broke 4 min. In parenthesis is the HS they attended.

1. Bob Schul 1964 Miami (Milton-Union)
2. Dave Wottle 1970 BGSU (Canton Lincoln)
3. Reggie McAfee 1973 UNC (Cincinnati Courtier Tech)
4. Steve Foster 1975 Florida TC (Madison)
5. Tom Byers 1981 Athletics West (Columbus North)
6. Kevin Ryan 1983 Athletics West (Cleve. St. Joseph)
7. Roosevelt Jackson 1988 Reebok (Orwell Grand Valley)
8. Bob Kennedy 1991 Indiana (Westerville North)
9. Mark Dailey 1993 New York AC (Lakewood St. Edward)
10. Rob Myers 2003 Ohio State (Lancaster Fairfield Union)

11. Ian Connor 2003 Nike (Galion Northmor)
12. Chris Estwanick 2004 Nike Farm Team (Dublin Coffman)
13. Jeff See 2007 Unattached (Middletown)
14. Tony Jordanek 2010 Unattached (Lexington)
15. Mack Chaffee 2011 Ragged Mountain TC (Chagrin Falls)
16. Cory Leslie 2011 Ohio State (Sandusky Perkins)
17. Brannon Kidder 2013 Penn State (Lancaster)
18. Chris Fallon 2013 Ohio State (Copley)
19. Jake Edwards 2014 Columbus RC (Delaware Hayes)
20. Eric Finan 2014 Team Minnesota (New Richmond)

21. Colby Alexander 2014 Oregon (Strongsville)
22. Clayton Murphy 2016 Akron (Tri Village)
23. Sam Prakel 2016 Oregon (Versailles)
24. Mick Stanovsek 2018 Oregon.(ND Cathedral Latin)
25. Kyle Mau 2018 Indiana. (Hudson)
26. Michael Hall 2018 Florida State (St. Xavier)
27. Willy Fink 2018 VT Elite (Maumee)
28. Ryan Adams 2020 Furman University (CVCA)
29. Jacob Dumford 2020 Under Armour/District TC (Westerville N)

Of the 29 athletes on the list, 16 broke 4 min for the first time while still running for their college team (or in their redshirt year).
(Schul, Wottle, McAfee, Kennedy, Myers, See, Leslie, Kidder, Fallon, Alexander, Murphy, Prakel, Mau, Stanovsek, Hall, and Adams.

Of the 29 athletes on the list, 9 have gone on to qualify for the 1500 meter final in the USA Championship Meet at least once (getting thru the heats to the championship race).
(Wottle, McAfee, Ryan, Byers, Myers, See, Alexander, Murphy, Prakel)

Reggie McAfee was the first African-American to break 4 in United States history.

Why is Sam Bair missing from the above list? Because he didn't attend HS in Ohio. He was from Pa. He did, however, run sub 4 for Kent State in 1967.
 
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9/1/20 post #2

Here is the updated list of top milers in Ohio History: UPDATED 9/1/20

TOP MILERS IN OHIO HISTORY


1) Tom Byers 3:50.84 run in 1982
2) Sam Prakel 3:50.94 run in 2019 (indoor) **
3) Clayton Murphy 3:51.99 run in 2017
4) Dave Wottle 3:53.3 (HT) run in 1973 *
5) Cory Leslie 3:53.44 run in 2014
6) Rob Myers 3:53.78 run in 2004
7) Colby Alexander 3:54.94 run in 2016
8) Jeff See 3:55.24 run in 2012
9) Steve Foster 3:55.1 (HT) run in 1977
10) Kevin Ryan 3:55.9 (HT) run in 1983
11)Brannon Kidder 3:56.06 run in 2018
12) Bob Kennedy 3:56.21 run in 1994

* NOTE: Dave Wottle's 3:53.3 was run in a race in Eugene, Oregon at Hayward Field. Pre invited Wottle to come out and race him in a mile. Wottle outkicked Pre for the win in, what was at the time, the second fastest time ever run by an American. Only Jim Ryun's World Record 3:51.1 was faster at the time. This race is featured in the "Fire On The Track" documentary on Pre.

NOTE: Colby Alexander ran 3:50.3 (HT) at the NYRRC 5th Avenue Mile in 2016. That is the fastest mile ever run by an Ohioan indoors, outdoors, or on a certified road mile.

** NOTE: Sam Prakel's 3:50.94 indoor mile ranks him as the #5 indoor performer of All-Time in US history... only 2 hundredths of a second from Galen Rupp in 4th ...and only 1.05 seconds off Bernard Lagat's American Record.
 
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9/1/20 post #3

TOP 1500 RUNNERS IN OHIO HISTORY... UPDATED 9/1/20

(All sub 3:37 runners)


1) Colby Alexander 3:34.88 run in 2016
2) Rob Myers 3:34.89 run in 2005
3) Cory Leslie 3:34.93 run in 2013
4) Jeff See 3:35.21 run in 2012
5) Brannon Kidder 3:35.27 run in 2019
6) Tom Byers 3:35.75 run in 1982
7) Dave Wottle 3:36.2 (HT) run in 1973
8) Clayton Murphy 3:36.23 run in 2016
9) Sam Prakel 3:36.54 run in 2018

NOTE: Sam Prakel ran 3:35.66 for 1500 en route to his indoor 3:50.94 mile. It ranks (and counts) as #9 All-Time on the US indoor performer 1500 list but can't count as an IAAF PR because it wasn't run in a 1500 race.

To make the list, Prakel's 1500 converts to a 3:53.86 mile.

To top the list, Alexander's 1500 converts to a 3:52.07 mile
 
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9/1/20 ... post #4

OHIO SCHOOLBOY ALUMNI MAKING A SPLASH THE YEAR BEFORE THE OLYMPIC TRIALS


A number of former Ohio HS stars are looking to make a bid to qualify for the 2021 Olympic Trials at 1500 meters and there are a few on the list who have a realistic shot at qualifying for the Olympic Team.

Sam Prakel...Oregon grad...3:36.54, 3:50.94...Sam will be a bonafide contender for the 2021 US Olympic 1500 Team...Sam is the 5th fastest indoor miler in US history...He has qualified for multiple USA Championship 1500/mile finals and has been ranked in the top 10 US 1500 runners by T&F News numerous times. His 1:46.75 800 speed shows he has the wheels to perform well in the sit and kick style common in championship 1500's...Sam captured his first USA Championship last weekend winning the USATF Road Mile Championships in Des Moines over the best field in the history of the race...

Clayton Murphy...Akron grad...3:36.23, 3:51.99...Clayton will likely run the 800 at the Trials, having won the Olympic bronze in the event in 2016. However if he chooses to run the 1500, he will be in the mix to make the team...Owning one of the fastest 800's in US history (1:42.93) he has world-class closing speed...most recently Clayton won the USATF indoor 1000 in 2019...Despite his focus on the 800, Clayton has been ranked by T&F News as a top 10 US 1500 runner multiple times...

Colby Alexander...Oregon grad...3:34.88, (3:50.3), 3:54.94...Like Sam, Colby has qualified for multiple USA Championship 1500/mile finals. Colby has also been ranked in the top 10 US 1500 runners by T&F News numerous times....a 1:46.09 half-miler, Colby has the speed necessary to make a USA 1500 meter team...After heel surgery forced him to miss the 2019 season, Colby came back with a 2:19.24 for 1000 meters indoors in 2020, missing the US All-Time top 10 performer list by less than a second...He achieved his highest USA Championship finish last weekend, placing a close 2nd to Sam Prakel at the USATF Road Mile Championship in Des Moines. Colby is another Ohioan with a good shot at an Olympic berth.

Brannon Kidder...Penn State grad...3:35.27, 3:56.06...Brannon has focused on the 800 for most of his career and has a PR of 1:45.39 for 800 meters. But his future may lie in the 1500. He ran the 2nd fastest 1500 in the US this indoor season (3:36.51) and is the 10th fastest performer over 1000 yards indoors in US history (2:18.26). After a US top 10 rank in the 1500 by T&F News last season, Brannon could be a player for an Olympic 1500 berth.

ALSO...

Willy Fink, Jake Edwards, Mick Stanovsek, Ryan Adams, Kyle Mau, and Jacob Dumford
all have excellent 1500/mile PR's as well. At this point questions remain as to what events they may focus on in 2021 and if it's the 1500, will they qualify for the Trials? (Historically it takes a sub 3:40 to get in).

Willy Fink...Eastern Michigan grad...Had a breakout performance this year at 1500, running 3:37.16. BUT, he also ran a mind blowing 13:17.15 5000 indoors this year. That's less than 6 seconds off the USA Indoor All-Time Top 10 5000 meter performers list. With that kind of 5000, I'm thinking he'll go 5000 at the Trials.

Jake Edwards (Ohio St) 3:38.77, Mick Stanovsek (Oregon) 3:39.82, Jacob Dumford (Notre Dame) 3:39.91, Kyle Mau (Indiana) 3:40.42, Ryan Adams (Furman) 3:40.44.... .Sub 3:40 usually makes it to the Trials. These guys are all close.
 
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NOTE: Sam Prakel ran 3:35.66 for 1500 en route to his indoor 3:50.94 mile.

To make the list, Prakel's 1500 converts to a 3:53.86 mile.
It is quite possible that I am misinterpreting the information but if not the conversions are pretty shaky.

Prakel ran 3:35.66 enroute to a 3:50.94. His 3:35.66 enroute time converts to 3:53.86, or is it another 1500 time that is being converted? If it is the 3:35.66, why convert when there is already a mile time (3:50.94). And how can the conversion be almost 3 seconds off of the actual time if 3:35.66 is being converted to 3:53.86.

If you cannot follow all of this it is because I wrote it and can barely follow it.
 
THREE FORMER OHIO 1600 STATE CHAMPS TAKE 1-2-5 AT USA ROAD MILE CHAMPIONSHIPS IN DES MOINES

In what was billed as the best field ever assembled for the USATF Road Mile Championships, 3 former State 1600 Champs from Ohio took 1-2-5 this past weekend at Drake University in Des Moines.

Sam Prakel and Colby Alexander kicked to a 1-2 finish moving from 4th and 5th to the top 2 spots over the final 300 meters.

The race finished with the final 600 meters on the Drake U track.

After the typical pedestrian pace that is so common in USA Championships, the field entered the stadium with 600 to go all tightly bunched. Sam and Colby were in 4th and 5th. With 300 to go they accelerated past 3:49 miler Johnny Gregorek and by the top of the turn with 150 left, moved ahead of Abe Alvarado and Joe Klecker. With a last lap of 53 seconds, Sam and Colby crossed the line 1-2 for an Ohio sweep and also an Oregon Duck sweep. They should have thrown up the "O" at the finish!

Following Sam and Colby across the line in 5th was another Ohio alum, Jake Edwards.

CONGRATULATIONS TO SAM PRAKEL ON HIS FIRST USATF NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP!!

RESULTS
Sam Prakel 3:58.3.......PR 3:50.94 mile
Colby Alexander 3:58.8.......PR 3:34.88 1500 ( = 3:51 Mi)
Joe Klecker 3:59.0.......PR 3:37.55 1500 ( = 3:54 Mi)
Tripp Hurt 4:01.2.......PR 3:36.83 1500 (= 3:53 Mi)
Jake Edwards 4:01.8.......PR 3:38.77 1500 ( = 3:55 Mi)
Abe Alvarado 4:02.0.......PR 3:36.82 1500 (= 3:53 Mi)
Johnny Gregorek 4:02.1.......PR 3:49.98 Mile
Graham Crawford 4:03.1.......PR 3:37.08 ( = 3:54 Mi)
Obsa Ali 4:06.0.......NCAA Steeple Champ
Erik Sowinsky 4:06.7.......PR 4:01.44 Mile / 1:44.58 800 PR
 
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It is quite possible that I am misinterpreting the information but if not the conversions are pretty shaky.

Prakel ran 3:35.66 enroute to a 3:50.94. His 3:35.66 enroute time converts to 3:53.86, or is it another 1500 time that is being converted? If it is the 3:35.66, why convert when there is already a mile time (3:50.94). And how can the conversion be almost 3 seconds off of the actual time if 3:35.66 is being converted to 3:53.86.

If you cannot follow all of this it is because I wrote it and can barely follow it.
Stats can be confusing! I agree!!

If you look at the top 10 list, Prakel is at the bottom in 3:36.54, not 3:35.66. His 3:35.66 can count as a Top Ten Performer time in US history because there was a clock at 1500. But because the time was not achieved in an actual 1500 race, the IAAF won't count it as a personal PR. That's why his PR on the list is 3:36, not 3:35. Same on his World Athletics Bio Page. That's the IAAF tho, maybe not me, you, or Sam. But that's why on the 1500 list, I didn't list his 3:35.66.

Using the following formula, 1500 in seconds X 1.08, you get a 3:52.91 from his 3:35.66. Using the same formula, you get 3:53.86 from his 3:36.54.

The reason for the 1.97 second difference in predicted mile time off his actual 1500 time and the actual mile time is because the predicted time is based on Sam finishing at the same pace he ran his first 1500 in. But as we all know these elite milers have 1 or 2 more gears in the final 100+ meters. Their pace accelerates significantly in the homestretch.

Hope this answers your question!
 
Thanks. I understand the conversions but did not realize it was a 1500 different than the enroute split that was being converted. I did not know that IAAF did not count FAT enroute times. I thought that was the reason for the camera at splits, so the marks would stand.

Thanks for the clarification. And if I were Sam I would certainly count my PR as the fastest time I officially passed a distance regardless of technicalities. There was a time that NCAA allowed the lead-off relay legs to qualify for nationals if there was FAT for the split.
 
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