NOW THAT TRYOUT SEASON IS HERE... I HAVE SOME THOUGHTS

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
Anyone that has read some of my posts about baseball know that I think high school coaches bunt too much and I wish more high school coaches in SWO were involved with summer baseball. But another issue that I have developed some passion and philosophy about is travel or club baseball. And now that tryouts are being posted and players are looking for new teams or clubs to join, I have some thoughts. These ideas are based ln 10 years of being a club baseball player dad and for a number of years an assistant coach. It is based on my son's experience and as his non-collegiate experience is winding down, I think I can give some general advice that would be helpful for players and parents.
First and by far most important (and this advice goes all the way up to 17U) find a team that you know your kid is going to play a lot on. Meaning, be realistic and know the situation before accepting a position on a team. If your kid is a Gold level player, do not play on team that is over gold level. Heck, consider silver or even bronze. The most important thing is that the boy plays all the time. More kids quit baseball because they sit for a season than for any other reason. Don't let this happen to your son. Of course I am assuming your player is going to work on his game on his own, but during the season, he must play because he will not get better sitting and not a getting significant number of at bats.
Second, try to find a team that has coaches that can teach your boy how to play the game and help him with his individual development. Too many times, a team does a great job scheduling practice and games, ordering unis and going to tourneys. That is great. But for your boy to get the most out of his club experience, the team must be able to help develop his skills. Going to a team that will teach the player how to play the game is equally as important.
Three, and this is for high school age kids, 15U and above must have no parents involved with the team, outside a team administrator. Just the appearance of parental involvement causes trouble and must be avoided at all costs.
Four, if your son is decent and wants to play baseball in college or even pro, then what tournaments the club goes to is important. And quite frankly, and no offense to any of the wonderful Cincy, CBUS and Cleveland tournaments, all the biggies are down south in Nashville, Atlanta and Florida.
Finally, until your son plays at the 18u point, try to stay away from becoming a PO. I have yet to see any high school or club program really have a program for PO's that keeps the PO engaged both in the off-season and in-season. Plus, once your son gets pegged as PO, it is a label that is very hard to shake no matter how good a defensive or offensive player, your son might be.
I hope some of this helpful and good luck with your search and your son's tryouts.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
That's reasonable. I was afraid you were going to say they should just move to the south for the entire summer.
No, I am not like that. I think it is nuts for kids to play at host families before they are seniors. Now the Redskins, Warhawks or Chi Town Cream, that is different but generally you are talking graduated seniors. . Also, the Lake Point perfect game event was the most scouted tourney, I ever saw. it was incredible.
 

InsideOhio

New member
I think one of the most important things a young man can do is to take charge of his own career. Parents play a big role in this process by either not caring at all, or by controlling their son too much. Around age 13-14, it's time for players to start taking things more seriously and learning vital skills that will only help as they progress through their baseball journey. If a player is going to miss practice, they should be the one letting the coach know, not the parents.

As far as playing beyond high school goes, I'd reason that most kids who are playing travel ball at 15/16U have some aspirations of playing in college or beyond. So why not start preparing for that? While playing time is important for any player, I'd rather my son learn what it feels like to sit on the bench or have to earn a spot. Many kids are not properly prepared to handle failure because Dad is right behind home plate when they are batting, eagerly giving advice after every single pitch.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
I think one of the most important things a young man can do is to take charge of his own career. Parents play a big role in this process by either not caring at all, or by controlling their son too much. Around age 13-14, it's time for players to start taking things more seriously and learning vital skills that will only help as they progress through their baseball journey. If a player is going to miss practice, they should be the one letting the coach know, not the parents.

As far as playing beyond high school goes, I'd reason that most kids who are playing travel ball at 15/16U have some aspirations of playing in college or beyond. So why not start preparing for that? While playing time is important for any player, I'd rather my son learn what it feels like to sit on the bench or have to earn a spot. Many kids are not properly prepared to handle failure because Dad is right behind home plate when they are batting, eagerly giving advice after every single pitch.
With all due respect, one does not need to practice sitting the bench. Lord knows, high school is great for sitting players, Get on a team that you will play.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
With all due respect, one does not need to practice sitting the bench. Lord knows, high school is great for sitting players, Get on a team that you will play.
Concur.
Play, and on teams where you play in a position that will help you.

I am a program development guy. I hate seeing teams getting ripped apart all summer and scattered around the state.

It's a diff mindset then what most of you have, I know.
Boy plays on a money team and the local. I prefer the local and I feel he gets better coaching and development there than the money leagues. He gets targeted instruction on what he will be asked to do his whole HS career.
Money team he does face some better pitching from time to time, but also faces some poor pitching.

Boy does admit he gets more productive coaching on his local team vs the money team.

...but the money team plays at some cool places.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
Concur.
Play, and on teams where you play in a position that will help you.

I am a program development guy. I hate seeing teams getting ripped apart all summer and scattered around the state.

It's a diff mindset then what most of you have, I know.
Boy plays on a money team and the local. I prefer the local and I feel he gets better coaching and development there than the money leagues. He gets targeted instruction on what he will be asked to do his whole HS career.
Money team he does face some better pitching from time to time, but also faces some poor pitching.

Boy does admit he gets more productive coaching on his local team vs the money team.

...but the money team plays at some cool places.
The local route does have some advantages. If yo do it, I would recommend going to as many showcases or PBR events as practical. They do a nice job of getting your name out there on a data base.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
The local route does have some advantages. If yo do it, I would recommend going to as many showcases or PBR events as practical. They do a nice job of getting your name out there on a data base.
The grandfather of a player told me today he looks forward to next year playing for the school team sonthebkid learns more about the game of baseball. Fundamental, team baseball is few and far between in money teams.

Next year he ahould truly learn the team aspect of the game of baseball because these money teams is tossing the eqt out and individual skills.

Quite honestly, I'm done with it.

Till next baseball season...which is...well...this fall maybe?

Adios amigos.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
The grandfather of a player told me today he looks forward to next year playing for the school team sonthebkid learns more about the game of baseball. Fundamental, team baseball is few and far between in money teams.

Next year he ahould truly learn the team aspect of the game of baseball because these money teams is tossing the eqt out and individual skills.

Quite honestly, I'm done with it.

Till next baseball season...which is...well...this fall maybe?

Adios amigos.
I think you equate big money club baseball to good baseball coaching and that is simply not the case and quite frankly is never really ever implied. Unless the organization siphons off some of the fees to pay for overhead or if their lucky their own field upkeep, the fees all should go to unis, team equipment, umpire fees and or tourney fees and if you on a team that is 15u or above: a paid head coach. I think you have sad that your son is involved with a well known facility and I don't know to much about them except that their 17U team is solid. But a lot of high school programs are not much better than some club programs for the exact opposite reason that you don't like club teams. The high school coaches are unaccountable to the players and the players cannot find the correct fit for themselves on the high school team. A good club team that is properly selected will play appropriate level competition and help a kid develop. I am saying this as my son might have five or six games left in his club career: Recruiters and scouts really don't care how well one plays the game. They care about speed, size, power and how hard a kid throws. On my son's team, the two best players are low level D1 and D3 commits because they are simply too small. If your son wants to continue to play, work really hard on strength, individual skills and showcase drills because that is what will get him noticed. Good luck this fall. Let us/ me know how it goes.
 

GCPRO

Well-known member
Most of the time HS coaches can coach circles around wanna be dads coaching some alleged high level summer team. My gosh it never ends.
thavoice played at one of the top HS programs in the state, I'm sure hes confident in his son's playing ability
 

thavoice

Well-known member
I think you equate big money club baseball to good baseball coaching and that is simply not the case and quite frankly is never really ever implied. Unless the organization siphons off some of the fees to pay for overhead or if their lucky their own field upkeep, the fees all should go to unis, team equipment, umpire fees and or tourney fees and if you on a team that is 15u or above: a paid head coach. I think you have sad that your son is involved with a well known facility and I don't know to much about them except that their 17U team is solid. But a lot of high school programs are not much better than some club programs for the exact opposite reason that you don't like club teams. The high school coaches are unaccountable to the players and the players cannot find the correct fit for themselves on the high school team. A good club team that is properly selected will play appropriate level competition and help a kid develop. I am saying this as my son might have five or six games left in his club career: Recruiters and scouts really don't care how well one plays the game. They care about speed, size, power and how hard a kid throws. On my son's team, the two best players are low level D1 and D3 commits because they are simply too small. If your son wants to continue to play, work really hard on strength, individual skills and showcase drills because that is what will get him noticed. Good luck this fall. Let us/ me know how it goes.
Not involved in that organisation this year, thank fully. They added a couple teams and man they are atrocious. They did quite a few people dirty after last season. He had an opportunity to be on one of those teams they added but chose wisely and is getting much better coaching than the last two years in that organization. The ONLY plus was their facility to use in the off-season but with school and other sports the time to actually go was minimal.

But other than playing in some fancy places and occasionally facing a stout pitcher, the whole money teams has not, as they say, the juice has not been worth the squeeze.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
Most of the time HS coaches can coach circles around wanna be dads coaching some alleged high level summer team. My gosh it never ends.
thavoice played at one of the top HS programs in the state, I'm sure hes confident in his son's playing ability
What is this response about?
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Most of the time HS coaches can coach circles around wanna be dads coaching some alleged high level summer team. My gosh it never ends.
thavoice played at one of the top HS programs in the state, I'm sure hes confident in his son's playing ability
Thanks. I was very fortunate to play for, and coach with, whom I consider the first family of Ohio h s baseball and I am extremely realistic of the boys ability, to a fault.

I have always been a front of the school uniform person. Players come and go, but programs are forever.

When I attend these money grabs each weekend I look for well coached teams who put in the work. Are they in the right positions at the right times. Do they throw to correct cut, backup where they are supposed to, able to run pickoffs, do they communicate not only on the tweeners but also the routine. Does it look like they work PFP in practice.

Are they a team, or just a bunch of individuals. Almost always the latter.

The boy and I constantly go over the scenarios they encountered and also the other team and amazing they just don't ever so it in practice.

Again I know the money teams aren't meant for that and I get a hard time getting over it. Every thing we did in practice as a player and coach was always the benefit of the program. The program.
I get it. I'm old school. My way of thinking is about team, not individuals. When we get together to talk of the good ole days it's not about the individual prowess after HS, but the banners on the OF fence.


Maybe I should be put out to pasture with my thoughts. This is more about the health of the game of baseball, not the boy. He gets what he needs, but I don't see this as a healthy way for the game of baseball to grow and prosper in the long run. All these money tournys I come away with a bad taste in my mouth, but when I watch em with the local school team and see the individual AND team fundamentals thought I see hope.

Our legendary football coach would say, outlive your season, put a banner on that wall and you'll be remembered forever. God Rest His Soul.



Maybe there is just no place in this game for me anymore.
 
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CedarBuck92

Active member
Every thing we did in practice as a player and coach was always the benefit of the program. The program.
I think you have to find a mix between best for program and best for each kid. Obviously the program will be there when the kids leave but you need to take care of the kids along the way.
 

GCPRO

Well-known member
If you are putting the program first you are doing what is best for each kid. Regardless of what you do in life, you are part of something bigger than yourself. Career, family, friendships all include the parameters of being a part of something bigger than yourself.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
If you are putting the program first you are doing what is best for each kid. Regardless of what you do in life, you are part of something bigger than yourself. Career, family, friendships all include the parameters of being a part of something bigger than yourself.
Could not have said it better. We all see it where we work as well. Those who do what's best for themselvesz and those who do what's best for their organization.

Same football coach I quoted above also would say "if you want to be successful, help someone else succeed".

This summer is winding down. Maybe one more tourny coming up.
Who knows, maybe we see a fall HS season.

I am still extremely bummed the spring season was banged. Godson's SR gone, like a fart in the wind. No chance to defend the title. I just cannot envision my SR season not even happening. I will recall the night after our last game. It become very melancholy when a buddy said "it's all over. We are never going to play together again". It still gets to me when I think of that moment. Playing baseball with the same friends from kindergarten through HS.

But what do they say...if you don't adapt you get left behind?

I will believe in the tried we true method I was taught. It still the standard in some places.

Lwts hope HS ball returns in the spring next year, and locally ACME comes back strong.

So let it be written, so it shall be done.

Until then, goodbye y'all.
 

CedarBuck92

Active member
If you are putting the program first you are doing what is best for each kid. Regardless of what you do in life, you are part of something bigger than yourself. Career, family, friendships all include the parameters of being a part of something bigger than yourself.
Then maybe I just haven't seen a coach implement this the right way.
 

GCPRO

Well-known member
It is difficult to impress upon kids how delicate our existence on earth is. Add the opportunities that athletics afford us and one has the ability to hopefully influence lives.
You have to hope players/parents/coaching staffs all understand this.
 

rossford_resident

Active member
I would suggest talking to current parents - the coach should be able to give you a few references. If he doesn't know which ones are unhappy (and avoid giving you their contact info), that would be a red flag for me. I know some parents are always going to be unhappy - talk to the ones who are coming back and ask them why.

I saw a guy spend 3 games this weekend on his phone in the dugout or chatting with the opposing dugout while his team was AB/on base and asking me how close they were to getting run ruled so he could go home. Also saw some teams that had an organized, well-run pregame routine with multiple coaches on the field and were competitive with a team that plays tournaments all over the Midwest and rosters kids from multiple states.
 

93 red ls

Active member
very good views/helpful hints for sure appreciate that!

The thing we have to remember is what is your kid really wanting out of the sport. 99% of the kids playing select baseball are not going to play that sport past their senior year in HS. The whole thing has to be to have FUN. We are in our 2nd year of select baseball and the thing i fear most with my son is him getting "burnt out" before he even reaches High School. He plays 2 sports primarily (baseball and basketball)
Both sports want you training in the off season , so sometimes you have your kid 5-6 days a week playing and conditioning/practing. I can see how very easily kids can be done with it by the time they are 15-16 years old.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
93 Red, it is hard to meet your potential in baseball and/or basketball if you don't work on those game specific skills in the offseason. if your son wants to be good in both, he is going to have to do both at the same time/season. That is just how it is.
I will admit that most club teams focus mostly on putting rosters together and putting together a season, buy unis and create a schedule. If you are good club or club coach, you do a good job teaching the players how to play the game (i.e. backup positioning, situational thinking, baserunning and even bunt coverage (I had a hard time typing that one)). I would like to say that good club teams are strong in that area but not until my kid joined his current did I see the huge emphasis on PFP or situational running. Most teams work on what I would call small unit skills (relays, double plays, infield/outfield fielding practice). But not one program without additional cost ever emphasized individual skill development. Extra lessons or working with Dad is what my son had to do to get better. We just did it today in fact. The problem is my eyesight is getting so that I cannot catch his fastball anymore. Anyway, I really feel that a program that offers individual skill development as part of its package would do very well.
 
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