Nathan "Nearest" Green the slave that taught Jack Daniels how to make whiskey

hubman

Well-known member

hubman

Well-known member
I thought the story in the above link was a very interesting piece of American history. I'm not a drinker but I have bought a bottle of Uncle Nearest as a keepsake.
 

hubman

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https://www.nearestgreen.com/

This beautifully shot short film, telling the story of the first known African- American master distiller, is about much more than whiskey. It is a story of honor, respect, and an unlikely friendship that could be the greatest American story you never heard.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
well, some story has to be the greatest.


Seems like a nice bit of Americana at the least. Wonder who taught him and given that his descendents continued to work for the distillery, why they took so long to get the story out?
 

hubman

Well-known member
well, some story has to be the greatest.


Seems like a nice bit of Americana at the least. Wonder who taught him and given that his descendents continued to work for the distillery, why they took so long to get the story out?
Somewhere I read they believe some of the techniques may have been brought over from Africa, because similar techniques of distilling were used in Africa then. Not sure what took so long for the story to come out, but they say it really was not a secret in that area.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Somewhere I read they believe some of the techniques may have been brought over from Africa, because similar techniques of distilling were used in Africa then. Not sure what took so long for the story to come out, but they say it really was not a secret in that area.
I can believe that, those societies are so old and so closed. I've come to the realization that history is revisionist. New facts, "new" stories bring a different light and a new audience to old understanding. There are still foods I crave, that I've no idea how they were made and haven't found in any "african" restaurant in the states. A taxi driver I'd used a lot took me down a back sandy alley where he got lunch. Foreingers weren't really "allowed" (so he said) and she did kind of give me a crooked eye until he talked to her. Some lady with a aluminum cook pot, who wouldh't tell anyone how she made her fish stew. MAN I MISS THAT.

Not sure why this story wasn't thought interesting enough until now to make a bigger story but I imagine it has more to do with marketing a product than clarifying history. Regardless, sounds fun, very Mark Twainish.
 

zeeman

Well-known member
I've come to the realization that history is revisionist. New facts, "new" stories bring a different light and a new audience to old understanding.





Not sure why this one wasn't thought interesting enough until now to make a bigger story but I imagine it has more to do with marketing a product than clarifying history. Regardless, sounds fun, very Mark Twainish.
Raspberries
 

hubman

Well-known member
 

gneiss rocks

Well-known member
Cool story. Most great inventors and craftsmen were not great businessmen. Only later are many of these brilliant minds given their due.

Reminds me of Tesla and Edison...when I was a kid very few people ever heard of Tesla and if they did it was something like "he was Edison's apprentice or something? Tesla was the weird guy who went bankrupt?... That is what the history books all said... It is only in the last few years that the general population began to realize Tesla for what he was. History lost and history found.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I can say I was at one time on the Tesla bandwagon for the same reason most were, he seemed esoteric. He was portrayed as a showman, a counterpoint to the mainstream. Felt to be "in the know" to know of him.

Now? Tesla is a fad I think. He's liked (even though unlikable) because Edison isn't. Edison was the capitalists. Ultimately, Tesla's contributions were experimental and generally unrecorded. He didn't even know how to record them.

He saved us from a wrong path to DC simply because he opposed Edison but ultimately, it was the work of Maxwell and then Oliver Heaviside that made AC what it is. There are many interesting parallels between Tesla and Heaviside. Both generally self-taught, swimming against the stream, a bit nutty. Both fit GRock's description.

It's Heaviside who made the long term contribution and is under recognized IMO. He not only invented like Tesla, he made himself mathematically proficient enought to reduce Maxwell's volumes into a t-shirt.

History is what it is, revisionist subject to new findings.
 
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BlackHawk

Well-known member
I can say I was at one time on the Tesla bandwagon for the same reason most were, he seemed esoteric. He was portrayed as a showman, a counterpoint to the mainstream. Felt to be "in the know" to know of him.

Now? Tesla is a fad I think. He's liked (even though unlikable) because Edison isn't. Edison was the capitalists. Ultimately, Tesla's contributions were experimental and generally unrecorded. He didn't even know how to record them.

He saved us from a wrong path to DC simply because he opposed Edison but ultimately, it was the work of Maxwell and then Oliver Heaviside that made AC what it is. There are many interesting parallels between Tesla and Heaviside. Both generally self-taught, swimming against the stream, a bit nutty. Both fit GRock's description.

It's Heaviside who made the long term contribution and is under recognized IMO. He not only invented like Tesla, he made himself mathematically proficient enought to reduce Maxwell's volumes into a t-shirt.

History is what it is, revisionist subject to new findings.
Nice info, eastisbest, but where did you get that piece of fake trivia?

The truth is that Nikola Tesla placed himself in a hypnotic trance and communicated telepathically to aliens from the Orion Constellation. The grey aliens directly supplied him with secrets of the universe, including A/C technology and radio technology. I saw it on an "Ancient Aliens" episode, so it must be true. A very reputable source.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Since I dropped cable, I can't get Orion unless the kid with the attenna holds it in the middle hand while standing on three.... uh... oh...
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
The TESLA TOWER ~ meant to transmit usable wireless AC electricity.



:>---

SALT
I'm no Tesla, but how was wireless electricity even supposed to work?

Sending electricity through the air or through radio waves seems like a really bad idea. What could go wrong? ;)
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
electricity and radiowaves are the same thing. Electricity being more the effects on matter to most people. It's the power and frequency that allow transmission efficiency and energy release.

emmm, that explanation sucked. I should be better. Stick your tongue in an outlet. That's your tongue feeling the power of a low frequency, high energy "radiowave." Low and high being relative. For a more detailed explanation:




emmm, and Ohm's I think


If Frequency is zero, those simplify to V=IR.

Could be wrong. Been awhile since I had to think.
 
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ohiopup

Well-known member
I'm no Tesla, but how was wireless electricity even supposed to work?

Sending electricity through the air or through radio waves seems like a really bad idea. What could go wrong? ;)
Well...

=> It could make all the people with head hair (I'm bald) stand on end
(like Van de Graaff generator)

=> Let you pickup music when you grind your teeth
(if you have fillings/braces with alternate metals)

=> Cook you brains if the wave lengths are micro-small

=> Disrupt your motor functions thru synapse interference

=> interrupt/shutdown alternate electrical signals/grids
IE...

:>---

SALT
 

hubman

Well-known member
Cool story. Most great inventors and craftsmen were not great businessmen. Only later are many of these brilliant minds given their due.

Reminds me of Tesla and Edison...when I was a kid very few people ever heard of Tesla and if they did it was something like "he was Edison's apprentice or something? Tesla was the weird guy who went bankrupt?... That is what the history books all said... It is only in the last few years that the general population began to realize Tesla for what he was. History lost and history found.
I guess a similar version of that with local ties (at least local to me) would be Charles Goodyear the scientist that patented the process of vulcanizing rubber but died pretty much penniless.
 
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