Manchester's Jay Brophy Retires

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
Such a historic program. It seems that once Ethan Wright graduated and Jim France retired it went straight downhill.
 

Raider#23

Well-known member
Talked to Jay Brophy when he was coaching at Sebring. Funny that at Sebring he actually helped take a program that was really bad into a somewhat competitive one for a few years. Sometimes coaches and schools just don't fit.
 

BelowTheLine

Well-known member
Talked to Jay Brophy when he was coaching at Sebring. Funny that at Sebring he actually helped take a program that was really bad into a somewhat competitive one for a few years. Sometimes coaches and schools just don't fit.
It's funny you say that because I was just looking it up to see if it was the same guy. I remember how disappointed everyone was when he left Sebring because he gave them some respectability.

Edit - I looked it up. Sebring won 11 games in the 16 years before Brophy. He went 4-6 in his second year and then left.
 
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BelowTheLine

Well-known member
Such a historic program. It seems that once Ethan Wright graduated and Jim France retired it went straight downhill.
The coach/school fit is the #1 factor in the success of a HS program. You can go through the Yappi football archives and see this same thing repeated several times and you see it all sorts of other sports as well. You also see the opposite. Schools that don't have great tradition and hire the right coach and take off.
 

Rich Kotite

Active member
I've never been a fan of hiring coaches who've never been a head coach before. Maybe that's my NFL and college football bias as I've seen so many "coordinators" become failed head coaches.

Manchester is in a tough spot IMO. You can talk new facilities but the spectre of "koach" lingers.

The new coach has to be a strong person with a track record.

You can be a Tuslaw and keep hiring young assistants to be head coach and then they leave every 2-3 years with a wrecked program left behind if you're not careful.
 

sug00

Member
Manchester will be much Improved next season and back to what it once was the season after that. They have a lot of kids out for football they played hard but with a lot of Sophomores and a tuff schedule it was just hard to be competitive.
 

TopCat

Well-known member
With returning talent and new, upgraded facilities in the next year or so, I would expect this job to be very attractive. Anyone hearing about possible candidates?
 

305NoTomato

Well-known member
I've never been a fan of hiring coaches who've never been a head coach before. Maybe that's my NFL and college football bias as I've seen so many "coordinators" become failed head coaches.

Manchester is in a tough spot IMO. You can talk new facilities but the spectre of "koach" lingers.

The new coach has to be a strong person with a track record.

You can be a Tuslaw and keep hiring young assistants to be head coach and then they leave every 2-3 years with a wrecked program left behind if you're not careful.
But all head coaches were once coordinators? How do you break through the glass ceiling then? Not trying to be a jerk here. Should coordinators get jobs at smaller schools first? That seems to be a trend.
 
you have to think they'll get some good coaches to apply. Manchester always has been a great small-town program who is used to wining.
 

Rich Kotite

Active member
But all head coaches were once coordinators? How do you break through the glass ceiling then? Not trying to be a jerk here. Should coordinators get jobs at smaller schools first? That seems to be a trend.
Most teams/schools do it by hiring coordinators. I'm just saying I wouldn't and I don't think Manchester should.

It's too good of a job and tradition to just hand it over to an inexperienced candidate.

Brophy didn't work out. Yes he was experienced but did he really "win" anywhere before Manchester as a HC? Not really. He was a little over .500 at St. V. The Irish program historically is such that you should do better than be 6-4 or 5-5 there. His record was 20-15 at St. V.

The Browns and Bengals have always hired "coordinators" with no experience as a HC. How's that worked out? I'd give you a bag of balls for Zac Taylor - that Bengals Super Bowl run was all Lou Anarumo and Joe Burrow.

Someone mentioned Bohley from Doylestown as a candidate. That's a very good one for Manchester.

If he doesn't want it, then find someone similar who's been a head coach with success.

There are some coaches still in the playoffs not far from Manchester that I'd call after it's over. Just my opinion.
 

thisisinsane

Well-known member
Personally, I don’t see how any experienced coaches would want the job. Especially ones that currently have their teams in the playoffs. Leave a team I got to the playoffs for another rebuild? No thanks.

The biggest issue, imo, is the complete lack of coaches anymore. In coaching, the responsibilities have only increased: expected communication with every parent for every little thing, more training, PAV licensing, CPR/First Aid, mental health training, the list goes on. Now, I’m not saying the responsibilities I listed are a bad thing. Simply saying that the responsibilities are ever-increasing, as well as time commitment, as well as their teaching job (or other profession); the one thing that doesn’t increase is the pay. I know, I know, most will say , “you don’t coach for the money”. I completely get that angle, but in the real world, it’s much more difficult to raise the responsibilities yet not raise the pay. HS coaches in other states (primarily Texas) get paid to simply coach.

I’m not a union guy, but a coaches union in Ohio may be a good start. It’s not the 80s/90s anymore where you can grab a teacher, ask them if they know anything about a sport and hand them a whistle.

The requirements are out-weighing the benefits to many.
 

BelowTheLine

Well-known member
Personally, I don’t see how any experienced coaches would want the job. Especially ones that currently have their teams in the playoffs. Leave a team I got to the playoffs for another rebuild? No thanks.

The biggest issue, imo, is the complete lack of coaches anymore. In coaching, the responsibilities have only increased: expected communication with every parent for every little thing, more training, PAV licensing, CPR/First Aid, mental health training, the list goes on. Now, I’m not saying the responsibilities I listed are a bad thing. Simply saying that the responsibilities are ever-increasing, as well as time commitment, as well as their teaching job (or other profession); the one thing that doesn’t increase is the pay. I know, I know, most will say , “you don’t coach for the money”. I completely get that angle, but in the real world, it’s much more difficult to raise the responsibilities yet not raise the pay. HS coaches in other states (primarily Texas) get paid to simply coach.

I’m not a union guy, but a coaches union in Ohio may be a good start. It’s not the 80s/90s anymore where you can grab a teacher, ask them if they know anything about a sport and hand them a whistle.

The requirements are out-weighing the benefits to many.
Think about this. A coach gets paid a stipend for the regular season. In football if they make it to the state championship game that's an extra 6 weeks of after school work away from their families, kids, etc. At most schools there is zero compensation for that extra time. It's literally more than half of a second season without an increase in any pay. Shameful.
 

serpico

Well-known member
Think about this. A coach gets paid a stipend for the regular season. In football if they make it to the state championship game that's an extra 6 weeks of after school work away from their families, kids, etc. At most schools there is zero compensation for that extra time. It's literally more than half of a second season without an increase in any pay. Shameful.
I assumed most schools pay extra the longer into the postseason a coach goes.
 

sheldoncooper

Active member
With returning talent and new, upgraded facilities in the next year or so, I would expect this job to be very attractive. Anyone hearing about possible candidates?
problem is there isn't much talent ... no Qb, horrible skill players, being the smallest or one of the smallest schools in the league also spells trouble down the road ...
 

Raylan_Givens

Well-known member
I actually don't believe that is the case.
Know a few AD/admins that have had successful football runs. All of them set aside money for the paid coaches to receive an extra stipend.

NOTE - that was PRE-Covid. Now that OHSAA has expanded the playoffs and taken money from the schools not sure if this policy would remain in effect/still be possible.
 

TopCat

Well-known member
I'm now hearing from a pretty good source that Brophy had planned to resign at the end of this season before it even began. He had even enquired about possibly stepping down before the season, but it was agreed that it was too late at that point. If that's the case, the powers that be at Manchester have known this was coming and have probably been looking at possible candidates already.
 

akron1

Well-known member
Know a few AD/admins that have had successful football runs. All of them set aside money for the paid coaches to receive an extra stipend.

NOTE - that was PRE-Covid. Now that OHSAA has expanded the playoffs and taken money from the schools not sure if this policy would remain in effect/still be possible.
Not disagreeing, just know this is not the majority of school's policies.
 

Helmet guy

New member
Maybe an alum who has experience taking a down program and giving it life. With over a decade of Head Coaching experience and knows and most importantly, embraces the tradition of said school.
 
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