Lemon Law in Ohio

cchs1983

Well-known member
I have a 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee and I've had it a total of 2 days in 2021. It first failed on me January first when the electrical system totally failed on me while driving. Charlies Dodge had it for nearly 3 weeks and returned it to me and less than 24 hours later it failed on me again. Charlies has it for 2-3 more weeks and return it to me and it fails on me again in less than 24 hours. Going to pick it up again tomorrow morning after being in the shop for the 3rd time for over 2 weeks. Every time I go and pick it up, they can't find anything wrong with it. It has over 50,000 miles and I owe over $15,000 on it. What if any recourse do I have?
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
The problems must occur within the first year or first 18,000 miles, whichever comes first, to qualify under the Lemon Law.

Your best option is to make as big of a stink as possible, starting with the dealer then making your way up through the complaint process with Jeep. Once you get it fixed, trade it in for a Toyota Highlander or Honda Pilot.
 

OldSoulon

Well-known member
This is why we lease.

Take minimal money out of pocket, never have to buy tires or brakes, or make any other repair.

Drive a new car every three years.
 

ogealbhain

Well-known member
I have a 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee and I've had it a total of 2 days in 2021. It first failed on me January first when the electrical system totally failed on me while driving. Charlies Dodge had it for nearly 3 weeks and returned it to me and less than 24 hours later it failed on me again. Charlies has it for 2-3 more weeks and return it to me and it fails on me again in less than 24 hours. Going to pick it up again tomorrow morning after being in the shop for the 3rd time for over 2 weeks. Every time I go and pick it up, they can't find anything wrong with it. It has over 50,000 miles and I owe over $15,000 on it. What if any recourse do I have?
Union made?
 

OldSoulon

Well-known member
The problems must occur within the first year or first 18,000 miles, whichever comes first, to qualify under the Lemon Law.

Your best option is to make as big of a stink as possible, starting with the dealer then making your way up through the complaint process with Jeep. Once you get it fixed, trade it in for a Toyota Highlander or Honda Pilot.
So electing Biden is still under the Lemon Law criteria?

Because I don't think he's traveled 18,000 miles in the last two or three years.
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
Mama Carlson on WKRP always said you should by real estate and lease cars as real estate appreciates while vehicles depreciate.

I've never leased a vehicle. I generally buy new and drive to 100K-120K miles then get another.
 

OldSoulon

Well-known member
Mama Carlson on WKRP always said you should by real estate and lease cars as real estate appreciates while vehicles depreciate.

I've never leased a vehicle. I generally buy new and drive to 100K-120K miles then get another.
See, I did the math, and seven years is about the breakeven point.

I just don't want to drive any car for seven years. Get too tired of it.

Not judging, just my opinion.
 

Foster

Active member
Does this electrical failure just come and go or are they doing something to get it going again? As long as they've had it, I hope someone is test driving it regularly to see exactly how it occurs. If not, then you should consider taking it elsewhere. Maybe there's an automotive electrical shop in your area.
 

EagleFan

Fan of Eagle
We also lease 3 years at a time for reasons noted above. 12-15,000 a year is enough miles for us, and my cars tend to just smell like an old shoe by the 4 year mark.


Last time I paid for anything other than an oil change? Last time I broke down on the road? I dunno, but it was before we shifted fully to leasing.
 

CedarBuck92

Active member
We also lease 3 years at a time for reasons noted above. 12-15,000 a year is enough miles for us, and my cars tend to just smell like an old shoe by the 4 year mark.


Last time I paid for anything other than an oil change? Last time I broke down on the road? I dunno, but it was before we shifted fully to leasing.
If my wife's commute wasn't so long we would likely lease as well. But alas the 20k a year she puts on a car just doesn't line up with a lease.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
This is why we lease.

Take minimal money out of pocket, never have to buy tires or brakes, or make any other repair.

Drive a new car every three years.
Guess it comes down to what's most important to you, a new car regularly or minimum money spent?

I have always avoided leasing as I am obsessed with spending a maximum of $.10 /mile on any vehicle rated less than 1 ton. So we buy rather than lease. You wont find any lease deals for 3 years 36k miles for a total of $3,600. I have found a couple in 2009 for $7,200 but that is a minimum cost of $.20 per mile.

The one thing that could influence my decision would be lack of reliability. What would they do if it was year 3 on a lease vehicle that began failing like mentioned above? Guessing the warranty would cover it but what about time with no vehicle while it is in the shop?
 

Tesoro

Well-known member
If it wouldn't be financially good for car companies to lease...they wouldn't do it. Never lease unless you own a business. Never borrow money for a new car.
 

OldSoulon

Well-known member
If it wouldn't be financially good for car companies to lease...they wouldn't do it. Never lease unless you own a business. Never borrow money for a new car.
I think in general leasing helps them move more units (cars), and helps the dealerships as their profit margin is tied more to how many cars they sell in a given month, quarter, or year, than the actual profit on them.

Dealers also get lots of 2 and 3 year old used cars with low mileage coming off leases to sell at a nice profit.

It's a strange business when you compare it to others.
 
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