IF NIL money comes to Ohio HS sports, how would you regulate it?

You can't play golf in Ohio in the winter, so we're saying if a student signed with an agent in anticipation of a future LPGA career, that student cannot be allowed to participate in a girls JV basketball game because... why?
If she's that good a golfer, doubt she's wanting to play JV basketball and is still training golf in winter.
 
If she's that good a golfer, doubt she's wanting to play JV basketball and is still training golf in winter.
In this case, I'm sure you are correct about that. It's a hypothetical. But the rules say she absolutely cannot be allowed to participate in a JV basketball game. Why?
 
You can't play golf in Ohio in the winter, so we're saying if a student signed with an agent in anticipation of a future LPGA career, that student cannot be allowed to participate in a girls JV basketball game because... why?
Just checked the bylaw guidance. It used tennis as an example reading that you can win money as a tennis pro and still play HS golf. You could also win money in a nonsanctioned sport like rugby and still be eligible for other HS sports.
 
Just checked the bylaw guidance. It used tennis as an example reading that you can win money as a tennis pro and still play HS golf. You could also win money in a non-sanctioned sport like rugby and still be eligible for other HS sports.
Thanks for clarifying. So now the question is why would a student be eligible for one sport but not another?
 
NIL in Ohio is inevitable. You can’t deny a kid with tens/hundreds of thousands of followers on social media the opportunity to use their name, image and likeness for marketing purposes. I have said this on here before, but there’s an athlete my kid competes against who has three times as many followers as the local national football recruit. His talents? Being good at soccer and basketball but better at Tik Toks. Most companies aren’t going to continue forking out money for guys to make cringey car commercials in Columbus if it doesn’t help their bottom line. Being comfortable in front of a camera like Caleb Williams will become more important in securing NIL deals.
It is the athletes that are off the radar that will ultimately lead to NIL being allowed in Ohio.
Christain Kaiser played football and wrestled at Bixby HS in Oklahoma. He had a huge following on Tik Tok and when NIL was approved in OK he was able to secure deals with western wear and other companies. He would create postgame content in his jersey with no product placement. The next day he was at a rodeo marketing products.
And please don’t give me the western Ohio kids aren’t trying to grow their social media accounts. They have them and many self promote just as much as a kid in the playing in the GWOC or OCC.
 
NIL in Ohio is inevitable. You can’t deny a kid with tens/hundreds of thousands of followers on social media the opportunity to use their name, image and likeness for marketing purposes. I have said this on here before, but there’s an athlete my kid competes against who has three times as many followers as the local national football recruit. His talents? Being good at soccer and basketball but better at Tik Toks. Most companies aren’t going to continue forking out money for guys to make cringey car commercials in Columbus if it doesn’t help their bottom line. Being comfortable in front of a camera like Caleb Williams will become more important in securing NIL deals.
It is the athletes that are off the radar that will ultimately lead to NIL being allowed in Ohio.
Christain Kaiser played football and wrestled at Bixby HS in Oklahoma. He had a huge following on Tik Tok and when NIL was approved in OK he was able to secure deals with western wear and other companies. He would create postgame content in his jersey with no product placement. The next day he was at a rodeo marketing products.
And please don’t give me the western Ohio kids aren’t trying to grow their social media accounts. They have them and many self promote just as much as a kid in the playing in the GWOC or OCC.
This was my point about the BS High players, one of them didn't know how to play football and was academically unqualified for admission to any university and the other might not have even been who he said he was. But they had a social media following and convinced some suckers to send money to their gofundme accounts.
 
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Most companies aren’t going to continue forking out money for guys to make cringey car commercials in Columbus if it doesn’t help their bottom line.
Disagree. Most folks who would be signing kids to these deals aren't doing it to make money; they're doing it for the reflected glory of supporting a winning team.
 
Yes, a high school student should be allowed to participate in high school sports at their school the same as the rest of their classmates.
And it appears they can, just not in the sport they are a pro. They don't have to turn pro. If they do turn pro, I don't see the draw in playing that sport in HS against comparatively weak competition particularly if they could enter a money paying tournament.
 
And it appears they can, just not in the sport they are a pro. They don't have to turn pro. If they do turn pro, I don't see the draw in playing that sport in HS against comparatively weak competition particularly if they could enter a money paying tournament.
The point is it's still high school students competing against other high school students. What is it about receiving a few dollars that you cannot allow that student participate anymore?
 
Disagree. Most folks who would be signing kids to these deals aren't doing it to make money; they're doing it for the reflected glory of supporting a winning team.
Unfortunately, I think you’re probably right. It all feels like SMU and their rivals in the 80’s. The big car dealership NIL commercials are too funny to me. Cade Stover and his deals just make sense and he seems more natural in front of the camera.
 
The point is it's still high school students competing against other high school students. What is it about receiving a few dollars that you cannot allow that student participate anymore?
I think they can receive up to 500, so yes they can receive a few dollars. Are you also ok with AAU basketball players getting paid as pros then showing up at the same school? Say OSU wants to pay some HS kids but wants them all at Watterson to get paid. Do you have a line?
 
I think they can receive up to 500, so yes they can receive a few dollars. Are you also ok with AAU basketball players getting paid as pros then showing up at the same school? Say OSU wants to pay some HS kids but wants them all at Watterson to get paid. Do you have a line?
It's not a dollar amount. It's who is paying the students and why.
 
The point is it's still high school students competing against other high school students. What is it about receiving a few dollars that you cannot allow that student participate anymore?
When a kid goes pro in a sport, typically agents, marketing reps and other "business" types get involved that could negatively affect the high school game if a student were allowed to still play at that level, despite turning pro. It'd be a slippery slope. Also, the implied competition imbalance. I can think of a million reasons why a kid who turns pro in high school should forfeit their eligibility; I can't think of a single reason why they should be able to keep it.
 
NIL in Ohio is inevitable. You can’t deny a kid with tens/hundreds of thousands of followers on social media the opportunity to use their name, image and likeness for marketing purposes. I have said this on here before, but there’s an athlete my kid competes against who has three times as many followers as the local national football recruit. His talents? Being good at soccer and basketball but better at Tik Toks. Most companies aren’t going to continue forking out money for guys to make cringey car commercials in Columbus if it doesn’t help their bottom line. Being comfortable in front of a camera like Caleb Williams will become more important in securing NIL deals.
It is the athletes that are off the radar that will ultimately lead to NIL being allowed in Ohio.
Christain Kaiser played football and wrestled at Bixby HS in Oklahoma. He had a huge following on Tik Tok and when NIL was approved in OK he was able to secure deals with western wear and other companies. He would create postgame content in his jersey with no product placement. The next day he was at a rodeo marketing products.
And please don’t give me the western Ohio kids aren’t trying to grow their social media accounts. They have them and many self promote just as much as a kid in the playing in the GWOC or OCC.
Some good points being made here; if NIL is allowed in high school, as I said before, I don't think it would affect football all that much. There's a reason why, in college, most of the NIL money that's outside the realm of superstar athletes goes to the Olivia Dunne types.
 
When a kid goes pro in a sport, typically agents, marketing reps and other "business" types get involved that could negatively affect the high school game if a student were allowed to still play at that level, despite turning pro.
I guess that depends on how you define "turning pro". If he's not getting paid to play, is he a pro? If he has engaged an agent but isn't receiving any money and hasn't signed any deals, is he a pro? And what's the difference between hiring an agent and hiring an advisor at an investment firm and paying him a commission?
 
I guess that depends on how you define "turning pro". If he's not getting paid to play, is he a pro? If he has engaged an agent but isn't receiving any money and hasn't signed any deals, is he a pro? And what's the difference between hiring an agent and hiring an advisor at an investment firm and paying him a commission?
Or hiring a recruiting firm, that somehow people are still dumb enough to do.
 
When a kid goes pro in a sport, typically agents, marketing reps and other "business" types get involved that could negatively affect the high school game if a student were allowed to still play at that level, despite turning pro. It'd be a slippery slope. Also, the implied competition imbalance. I can think of a million reasons why a kid who turns pro in high school should forfeit their eligibility; I can't think of a single reason why they should be able to keep it.
I can see that but "turning pro" and hiring an agent usually means leaving high sports behind of their own accord and it's a relatively miniscule number. The NIL landscape is so murky especially at the high school level I'm just trying to explore some hypothetical situations to see how it would play out in reality for the broader population of athletes.

To get back to the original question of how to regulate NIL and for those would like to keep a tight lid on it, how about this: OHSAA hires an accounting or marketing firm to determine a valuation of high school student-athletes' NIL. The formula might be based on social media following, the sport, the school, individual athletic achievement, grades, and like it or not, looks. My guess is the value would range from zero to low four figures. Compensation would be limited to that students' value range as determined by a formula and any deals with excessive compensation would be disallowed, the reasoning being that anything extra is paying for something other than the athlete's name, image and likeness.
 
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Or hiring a recruiting firm, that somehow people are still dumb enough to do.
All kinds of students engage outside services to enhance their college prospects (e.g. SAT tutoring services). If an athlete pays one of them, is s/he now ineligible? What's the difference?
 
All kinds of students engage outside services to enhance their college prospects (e.g. SAT tutoring services). If an athlete pays one of them, is s/he now ineligible? What's the difference?
The difference is they are paying for a service, not getting paid to be an athlete. FWIW, I don't think tik tok or other social media influencer type stuff should really even be considered in NIL unless there is direct marketing.
 
To get back to the original question of how to regulate NIL and for those would like to keep a tight lid on it, how about this: OHSAA hires an accounting or marketing firm to determine a valuation of high school student-athletes' NIL. The formula might be based on social media following, the sport, the school, individual athletic achievement, grades, and like it or not, looks. My guess is the value would range from zero to low four figures. Compensation would be limited to that students' value range as determined by a formula and any deals with excessive compensation would be disallowed, the reasoning being that anything extra is paying for something other than the athlete's name, image and likeness.
The amount of NIL potentially involved in high school athletics is so miniscule that the ROI from a solution like this would be miniscule, if not negative. And if you thought the concept of NIL was a slippery slope before, can you imagine the can of worms a system like this would open? It's so arbitrary and easily corruptible that a barrage of lawsuits would likely occur. And this boils down to one of the main reasons I'm against NIL for high school athletes; such a system's end result would be like that of many others: the only people who get rich would be the lawyers.
 
All kinds of students engage outside services to enhance their college prospects (e.g. SAT tutoring services). If an athlete pays one of them, is s/he now ineligible? What's the difference?
Right, how is that really any different from having an agent?
 
When you engage an agent, you are paying for a service. That is not being paid for being an athlete. Indeed, the alleged athlete is the one paying.
I think the issue is that sports agents have been allowed to provide loans or advances to their clients based on potential future earnings. So, yeah, that's being paid for being an athlete. On the strictly NIL front I would more compare it to a talent agent.
 
I think the issue is that sports agents have been allowed to provide loans or advances to their clients based on potential future earnings. So, yeah, that's being paid for being an athlete.
I can loan money to a kid on the prospect of being repaid. Is that verboten?
 
can loan money to a kid on the prospect of being repaid. Is that verboten?
You can't loan a kid money with the condition of being repaid by future pro contracts and acting as their sports agent unless you inform them they will lose their amateur eligibility, be it HS or college.
 
You can't loan a kid money with the condition of being repaid by future pro contracts and acting as their sports agent unless you inform them they will lose their amateur eligibility, be it HS or college.
If I loan a kid money on the prospect of being repaid, how he earns the money to make that repayment is immaterial. If there is no agreement stating the specific collateral (e.g. future athletic earnings), it's just a run-of-the-mill loan.
 
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