Hurricane Ian

eastisbest

Well-known member
Hard to imagine

Watching most of the videos, it looked like a normal Nor'eastern here. That was the only one I found that showed the ocean creeping up to the second story, then roof of a building. Then I realized, WHOLE different animal. Just as amazing to me, how quickly it cleared out.

I heard on the radio S. Carolina was buckling down. What path did this thing take crossing Florida and did the panhandle get spared then? Georgia?
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
Watching most of the videos, it looked like a normal Nor'eastern here. That was the only one I found that showed the ocean creeping up to the second story, then roof of a building. Then I realized, WHOLE different animal. Just as amazing to me, how quickly it cleared out.

I heard on the radio S. Carolina was buckling down. What path did this thing take crossing Florida and did the panhandle get spared then? Georgia?
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Barely a Category 1 when it hit SC.

Ian dumped over a foot of rain on the Orlando area, which of course lies in a drained swamp.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I guess it's not so much the rain or the wind. It's the push on the body of water that made Ft Myer's different than the other communities in the path. How the hell does Puerto Rico even still exist.
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
It is all in the angle of the water surge against the coastline. The geometry just didn't work put for poor Fort Myers.

My sister in law is in Pawleys Island, just south of Myrtle. They got hammered but made it through okay,
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
I guess it's not so much the rain or the wind. It's the push on the body of water that made Ft Myer's different than the other communities in the path. How the hell does Puerto Rico even still exist.
I heard on the radio that all of the newly (post-Maria) constructed stuff stood up very well against Ian.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
I heard on the radio that all of the newly (post-Maria) constructed stuff stood up very well against Ian.
That doesn't surprise me. I'm guessing local building codes became even more strict for producing structures that can stand up to more intense conditions, as was the case 30 yrs. ago after Andrew. Hard to believe Andrew was that long ago already!


Reporting back after hearing from my aunt and uncle who returned to Sun City (SSE portion of Tampa Bay) on Saturday: Damage was minimal when considering the 120 mph wind gusts the area experienced. A few homeowners lost their roofs, many trees were downed and plenty more were thinned out. Word is the people in Sarasota, Charlotte, and Lee Counties have a real mess (those would be 2, 3, and 4 counties to the south, respectively). No water or power, flooded houses, houses that are structurally unsound and will need to be razed or houses that were completely destroyed. As for their own house, they only lost a potted plant, a piece of flashing, and some fronds from their favorite palm tree but have nothing to complain about. They also saw plenty of emergency aid vehicles that were likely headed farther south to the Ft. Myers area.
 
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