How many Ohio boys make the top 50 times in the 100 meter dash all time in the USA

Lancermania

Lancers lead the way!
Believe it or not not a single one. The times range from 10.20 to 9.98. I was unaware any school boys had broken 10.00.
 

Lancermania

Lancers lead the way!
Matthew Boling ran the fastest 100-meter dash recorded by a high school sprinter at the Texas Region 6A-3 meet on April 27, 2019, clocking 9.98 seconds.

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Matthew Boling in center.
 
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JAVMAN83

Well-known member
Boling's 9.98 was with a +4.2 mps wind...over the allowable.

Trentavis Friday holds the all-time legal HS record of 10.00 (+1.6 mps) set at the 2014 USATF Jr. Champs.

Boling holds the scholastic HS record with his 10.13 (+1.3 mps) set at the 2019 Texas State Champs.

Boling is =#5 all-time among legal HS performers.
 

Lancermania

Lancers lead the way!
It should be mentioned that Trayvon Bromell is the only other prep athlete under 10.00 in all conditions with his wind aided 9.99 at the Southwest Classic
 

Lancermania

Lancers lead the way!
Boling's 9.98 was with a +4.2 mps wind...over the allowable.
Trentavis Friday holds the all-time legal HS record of 10.00 (+1.6 mps) set at the 2014 USATF Jr. Champs.
Boling holds the scholastic HS record with his 10.13 (+1.3 mps) set at the 2019 Texas State Champs.
Boling is =#5 all-time among legal HS performers.
Mureida1 showed that the advantage of a +2.0 m/s wind is 0.10 seconds for male sprinters and 0.12 seconds for female sprinters.
  1. MUREIKA, J.R. (2001) A Realistic Quasi-physical Model of the 100 Metre Dash. Canadian Journal of Physics, 79 (4), p. 697-713
 

coltfan76

Active member
Mureida1 showed that the advantage of a +2.0 m/s wind is 0.10 seconds for male sprinters and 0.12 seconds for female sprinters.
  1. MUREIKA, J.R. (2001) A Realistic Quasi-physical Model of the 100 Metre Dash. Canadian Journal of Physics, 79 (4), p. 697-713
Thanks for posting this. I've always wondered what the math was on this and never taken the time to look it up.
 

JAVMAN83

Well-known member
Good information, Lancermania. However, I take that adjustment calculator with a grain of salt. As an engineer who has some basic knowledge of fluid mechanics, of which the movement and forces involved with the movement of air on an object (i.e., runner), there is no way to effectively evaluate the influence (time-wise) upon a runner to an exact amount. The force imparted on an object by a steady-state wind (constant velocity & direction) is directly proportional to effective area profile of that object with respect to the wind. Given that arms & legs are changing direction over 4 times/second during the course of a run in a sprint, it is difficult to create a reasonably accurate area profile that the runner provides with respect to the wind.

That said, Mureika's work may be the only current source that provides a reasonable assessment of the wind's influence upon a runner.

What is more problematic is the methodology by which wind readings are made. They in effect averages calculated over the course of a run/jump in direction of the track/runway. It gives no information with regard to the variability of the wind/direction over the course of the event. For example, stadiums and other objects (trees, buildings, etc.) create varying wind speeds and direction that influence runners/jumpers, and frequently, quite substantially. Welcome Stadium, Ohio Stadium, Jesse Owens Stadium are prime examples where the winds can vary greatly depending upon where you are in the stadium at any given moment. Ohio & Welcome Stadiums were notorious for their massive headwinds on the backstretch given the relative North-South orientations of those stadiums with their start/finish lines being near the southwest corners of the stadium. Likewise, frequently one would see a strong tailwind (from the north) near the early stages of a 100m/110mH/100mH in those stadiums, while the wind would drop off during the latter part of the sprint. IUPUI's facility (a West-to-East orientation) in Indianapolis where FloJo set the women's world record of 10.49 (of which I had the fortune of being there in person to see that!) had a situation where the official reading of +0.0 wind was confirmed despite the fact that winds upward of +5 mps were being recorded on the nearby triple jump runway. That facility, having been there many times myself, has a lot of swirling winds nearer the east end of the facility as you get nearer the grandstand and away from the open east end of the stadium. Stadiums and objects near them affect winds quite profoundly at times depending on the direction of the wind at any given time. For anyone who has flown airplane or other aircraft (as I have), they will tell you that when coming into a landing situation, wind variability can be quite profound when you get near the ground where buildings and other objects disturb the wind that one sees just a few hundred feet higher. In fluid mechanics terms, laminar air flow (constant speed/direction) becomes quite turbulent upon the introduction of objects (buildings, etc.) near the ground.

While quite long-winded, I hope this helps those who haven't thought about the subject much as to the nature of influence of wind upon athletic performances and how variable it can be. This also applies particularly to the discus & javelin throws where the wind can and does have profound influences upon the flight of the implement. Same thing goes with the pole vault where vaulters have to account for wind direction/speed when vaulting.

Anyway, you all have a good day!
 

Seek Up

Active member
Lancermania - your thread got me thinking: what is Ohio's softest record when compared to a national list? It may just be the 100m. There are some pretty solid marks in a number of events. Just wonderin'...
 

CC Track Fan

Active member
Anyone have thoughts on why OH has not had a great 100 runner? Two of the fastest I can think of also or only did hurdles Chris Nelloms and Ted Ginn. If they focused on 100 good chance they would be in top 100.
 

Termite2

Well-known member
Jesse Owens ran a 9.94 100yd in high school; a WORLD record. only ran a 10.3 in the 100m at the Olympics for Olympic gold; was faster in the Prelims.
 

Newton's Third

Active member
Anyone have thoughts on why OH has not had a great 100 runner? Two of the fastest I can think of also or only did hurdles Chris Nelloms and Ted Ginn. If they focused on 100 good chance they would be in top 100.
My first "guess" would be the lack of season-long great sprinting weather. Could this limit quality opportunities in comparison to the other higher populated states? If this has any impact at all then IL, MI, & NY would probably also be lacking in the 100 while CA, TX, FL, GA, & the SE in general would be holding most spots.
 

JAVMAN83

Well-known member
Jesse Owens ran a 9.94 100yd in high school; a WORLD record. only ran a 10.3 in the 100m at the Olympics for Olympic gold; was faster in the Prelims.
Where in the world did you get 9.94? FYI - No auto-timing during that era except for experimental purposes. I take it that you converted a 9.7 MT by Owens. An attempt at electronic timing was made at the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles, but was never made official in the Games until 1972 as the only method of timing.

However, Owens ran 9.4 MT in HS, not 9.7 MT. It would be foolish to try and convert to FAT.
 

JAVMAN83

Well-known member
Lancermania - your thread got me thinking: what is Ohio's softest record when compared to a national list? It may just be the 100m. There are some pretty solid marks in a number of events. Just wonderin'...
That would be an interesting project!
 

mathking

Well-known member
There is a pretty simple explanation for Ohio "not producing a great 100 dash runner" for HS, if you ignore women and Jesse Owens and Harrison Dillard, which are pretty big ignores. Weather. Great times in the 100 require favorable weather conditions. There is a huge difference between what is possible at 45 degrees and what is possible at 80 degrees. Overwhelmingly the short sprint lists are dominated by athletes from warmer climates where they can sprint safely at full speed close to year round. More good sprinting weather means faster speed development and even more importantly for elite performances, a much greater chance of favorable conditions needed for elite performances. This means significantly more chances for favorable conditions.
 

EuclidandViren

Active member
Anyone have thoughts on why OH has not had a great 100 runner? Two of the fastest I can think of also or only did hurdles Chris Nelloms and Ted Ginn. If they focused on 100 good chance they would be in top 100.
My two favourite 100-meter runners were
Jonathan Burrell- injured constantly as a senior. I believe he would've been much faster his senior year
Brandon Saine- if it wasn't for football this kid would've been an Olympian. Saine had all the tools but the mindset for the track.
He never trained in high school and will go down as a top 10 all-time as a sprinter. He could've been an absolute stud.
 
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