Homicide squeeze!

NothingButTheTruth

Active member
Now that kid was locked in on the pitch and keeping his head on the ball. Luckily, the kid that stole home got to keep his head on his person. Wow that was a close call.
 

Salesman

Active member
As a parent plus coaching youth baseball for many years I don't mind telling you I gasped and became light headed when I watched this. Now I am thinking of the legal ramification if the bat and his head made contact.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
Color me shocked that dumb adults try the stupidest "means-to-an-end" plays in youth baseball. Barf.
 

fortfan

Well-known member
Color me shocked that dumb adults try the stupidest "means-to-an-end" plays in youth baseball. Barf.
How do you know the kid at the plate didn't just miss the sign that he was stealing home? I really doubt the coaches "planned" this the way it happened.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
How do you know the kid at the plate didn't just miss the sign that he was stealing home? I really doubt the coaches "planned" this the way it happened.
The kid may have missed the sign, but in any case signs and strategies (such as stealing home, hit-and-run) should be ironed out beforehand in practices.

The coach is responsible for what he calls, even if the kid missed the sign. After all — why would you make the call if it wasn’t clear the kid at the plate knew what he was doing? Does the kid not pay attention in practice?
 

CoachHoversten

Active member
I am not usually one to talk about bush-league things, but I hate when coaches of teams of players who are 8 and 9 teach anything but fundamentals. Learn to field, throw, positioning, etc. Trying for a triple on a pop up in the infield because no one can catch the ball is not teaching them things they will use when older.

When my son was about 9, other team had a runner on third. Pop up to shortstop was caught. Coach screamed for his kid to tag and run....he scored because SS couldn't throw very well and catcher couldn't catch very well. I had words with him, and when I said "you would never do that in HS" he said "I coach HS and we do it all the time". Really? You tag up from third on a routine pop up to the infield? Right...

Let;s steal home and run a suicide on 60 foot bases with stealing allowed bc the pitcher throws 25 mph and teach them nothing except how to show off and maybe get decapitated. Good coaching
 

thavoice

Well-known member
I am not usually one to talk about bush-league things, but I hate when coaches of teams of players who are 8 and 9 teach anything but fundamentals. Learn to field, throw, positioning, etc. Trying for a triple on a pop up in the infield because no one can catch the ball is not teaching them things they will use when older.

When my son was about 9, other team had a runner on third. Pop up to shortstop was caught. Coach screamed for his kid to tag and run....he scored because SS couldn't throw very well and catcher couldn't catch very well. I had words with him, and when I said "you would never do that in HS" he said "I coach HS and we do it all the time". Really? You tag up from third on a routine pop up to the infield? Right...

Let;s steal home and run a suicide on 60 foot bases with stealing allowed bc the pitcher throws 25 mph and teach them nothing except how to show off and maybe get decapitated. Good coaching
I hated the local Tball and Coach pitch leagues. They had those lines in between the bases as to where the runners had to go once the ball was 'dead', which meant to the pitcher.
So...what did some of the winning teams do at the younger level? Instead of trying to get runners out, they would throw to the pitcher and stop each runner at one base. There would be enough times of a pop up, or a very easy force out, for innings to end but many taht was complete BS and taught them nothing.
 

szerszen

Member
I hated the local Tball and Coach pitch leagues. They had those lines in between the bases as to where the runners had to go once the ball was 'dead', which meant to the pitcher.
So...what did some of the winning teams do at the younger level? Instead of trying to get runners out, they would throw to the pitcher and stop each runner at one base. There would be enough times of a pop up, or a very easy force out, for innings to end but many taht was complete BS and taught them nothing.
My favorite in Tball and coach pitch was when the pitcher just ran to first (or to home if the base were loaded) on a ground ball instead of actually learning to throw and catch a baseball. It was a track meet instead of learning to play the game. I didn’t let my son‘s team do it, and the parents ended up getting mad at me because we lost most of our games.
 

Philly_Cat

Well-known member
I am not usually one to talk about bush-league things, but I hate when coaches of teams of players who are 8 and 9 teach anything but fundamentals. Learn to field, throw, positioning, etc. Trying for a triple on a pop up in the infield because no one can catch the ball is not teaching them things they will use when older.

When my son was about 9, other team had a runner on third. Pop up to shortstop was caught. Coach screamed for his kid to tag and run....he scored because SS couldn't throw very well and catcher couldn't catch very well. I had words with him, and when I said "you would never do that in HS" he said "I coach HS and we do it all the time". Really? You tag up from third on a routine pop up to the infield? Right...

Let;s steal home and run a suicide on 60 foot bases with stealing allowed bc the pitcher throws 25 mph and teach them nothing except how to show off and maybe get decapitated. Good coaching
THIS!!!

I've never called a suicide squeeze with a team under 14 years old. And honestly my cutoff is probably 12, but it has to be a high level team with players that all are fully engaged.

Now on the coaching the game part. I've always been an advocate of coaching the game to the kids properly and not coaching the kids to play according to the level. I've seen coaches at the 8/9/10 year old ages that automatically have their kids going to 2nd on every ball hit in the infield because they know the kids will struggle fielding and throwing so if they just keep running eventually the other team will keep throwing the ball away and won't know what to do. Coaching are doing these young kids a huge disservice by not teaching them how to play the game properly.
 

Philly_Cat

Well-known member
My favorite in Tball and coach pitch was when the pitcher just ran to first (or to home if the base were loaded) on a ground ball instead of actually learning to throw and catch a baseball. It was a track meet instead of learning to play the game. I didn’t let my son‘s team do it, and the parents ended up getting mad at me because we lost most of our games.
Or the coaches that purposely turn their batters in certain directions so they hit it off the tee in certain directions of players on defense they know cant field.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Or the coaches that purposely turn their batters in certain directions so they hit it off the tee in certain directions of players on defense they know cant field.
Yeah, I saw that. A female Tball coach did that a number of years ago. Not only did it make the game take longer as for each batter she drew a line in the box for both feet for each batter, and it was such bush league!
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Our youngest youth league, (we dont do TBALL) they play 3 inning games, each kid gets to hit each inning.
No uniforms.
No real 'teams'.
Emphasis on fun and teaching the game.
No designated coaches but instead instructors at the park who administer the games.

Last batter of the inning will keep running. At times a kid will be 'smart' and field it and run to a base so he cannot keep going. We would always encourage, tell them to throw the ball to a base to get a runner out so they learn how to actuall do such things.


To this day we still run the young kids program at this level. Family goes on vacation? No worries, you are not letting your team down because each time the teams are divided up each day. I HATED where the boy was going and how they made 6-10 yr old games as if they were life or death. Vacation? Nope. Cannot let your TBALL team down.

Such BS.

But anyways...........
 

CoachHoversten

Active member
Our youngest youth league, (we dont do TBALL) they play 3 inning games, each kid gets to hit each inning.
No uniforms.
No real 'teams'.
Emphasis on fun and teaching the game.
No designated coaches but instead instructors at the park who administer the games.

Last batter of the inning will keep running. At times a kid will be 'smart' and field it and run to a base so he cannot keep going. We would always encourage, tell them to throw the ball to a base to get a runner out so they learn how to actuall do such things.


To this day we still run the young kids program at this level. Family goes on vacation? No worries, you are not letting your team down because each time the teams are divided up each day. I HATED where the boy was going and how they made 6-10 yr old games as if they were life or death. Vacation? Nope. Cannot let your TBALL team down.

Such BS.

But anyways...........
Common sense is not welcome on the internet
 

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
I doubt the kid missed a sign for a squeeze play. Looks to me like the kid stealing home was trying to do exactly that...steal home. He saw the pitcher go from the windup and figured he could make it. I didn't hear anything in the video (maybe there was) from anyone that he was going, defense or offense.

These are the kind of plays you have at younger age groups because the players and coaches are inexperienced. Kind of tough to throw anyone under the bus for this because its not something that many people would think about when coaching 11 year olds unless they had prior experience.

I wish the screen was a little wider so we could see what the 3rd base coach was doing as the runner took off. I would hope that this team and 3rd base coach would now have system in place to avoid something similar in the future. If it happens again, then it is on the coaches.
 

Gbulldog

Active member
You can sue a ham sandwich if you want....... Doesn't mean there will be any legal ramifications for said ham sandwich

So again, what are the legal ramifications?
I can't see any legal actions holding water If someone decided to go that route. That would open up a can of worms across all sports....man, at least I hope it wouldn't stand up.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
I can't see any legal actions holding water If someone decided to go that route. That would open up a can of worms across all sports....man, at least I hope it wouldn't stand up.
Of course there wouldn't be anything holding water.

The assertion that legal ramifications were to be had if the runner got injured is unfounded. (outside the highly unlikely scenario that the coach told the kid to intentionally try to injure his teammate)
 
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