FCC Announces Academy Teams for 19-20 Season

Philly_Cat

Active member
I won't dispute this and suspect that the variability in High School Soccer coaching is very large. But I'm not saying they should be scouting HS soccer today I'm saying that maybe the powers that be in American soccer should be looking at HS soccer as the place to invest their money and energy so that the coaching & skills training improves.



Think of HS soccer as one of those great old houses they remodel on HGTV. The place needs a lot of work but the bones are solid and the potential end product after the remodeling is spectacular. You even said it yourself Gr8tSOccr that HS soccer was "a blast". That's the environment that can attract kids to play for their high school that can't easily be imitated in club soccer.



The other advantage of using HS soccer as the infrastructure for developing players is that you already have outposts in the urban areas where soccer isn't popular but athletic kids reside in abundance. It's easier to make inroads at inner city high schools then trying to attract kids to "club" by putting in a soccer field at the local park.



And to be clear, HS soccer wouldn't be responsible for the final training of talent. That would be left to elite "clubs" and academy's. It would follow the football situation where HS introduces a highly competitive version of the sport to teenagers. Even though only a very small number of kids will go on from HS to play in the MLS and on the National Team millions more will become lifetime fans for having played HS soccer.
I pretty much completely agree with this 100%. The problem becomes getting the people with money and resources to buy into that vision, knowing there is going to be quite a while of investment with little to no return. Jut I agree, that once that hump is finally gotten over there talent that will begin to flourish in that environment will be bountiful. It can and would start to look very similar to what you get for the next level from high school talent in most of the other sports.

I don't think trying to mold soccer into the European mold of developing talent is the right choice in America. This is one place where our way of cultivating athletic talent probably would be best here in this country.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

Gr8tS0ccr

Member
I pretty much completely agree with this 100%. The problem becomes getting the people with money and resources to buy into that vision, knowing there is going to be quite a while of investment with little to no return. Jut I agree, that once that hump is finally gotten over there talent that will begin to flourish in that environment will be bountiful. It can and would start to look very similar to what you get for the next level from high school talent in most of the other sports.

I don't think trying to mold soccer into the European mold of developing talent is the right choice in America. This is one place where our way of cultivating athletic talent probably would be best here in this country.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
I would be all for it as well except that I do think a short HS season isn’t ideal for training and development. If only they would listen to us little people. :)
 

lotr10

Well-known member
I would be all for it as well except that I do think a short HS season isn’t ideal for training and development. If only they would listen to us little people. :)
I would move the HS soccer season to Spring where it would compete with baseball & not football. This wouldn't help the short season situation you bring up but it could create a Friday night social event similar to what football has in the Fall and Basketball has in the winter.

I also think that you would have kids playing BOTH soccer & football. Now before folks laugh at me about this I remember years ago a National Team level HS soccer player moved to Cincinnati from Arizona and had to decide whether to play soccer or football at Lakota West! He had been an all state safety back in Arizona! He choose soccer and when I saw him play in a game at Fairfield there was no doubt he would have been a stud on the football field to. The kid was BIG & FAST.

BTW, dual soccer & football players would follow the old tradition of dual football & lacrosse players. Where I grew up in Western NY it was common for kids to play both sports. Don't forget that Jim Brown was a great lacrosse player to.

Finally if you want to make inroads into the urban areas this is how you do it - soccer in the spring & summer and football in the fall.
 

lotr10

Well-known member
I pretty much completely agree with this 100%. The problem becomes getting the people with money and resources to buy into that vision, knowing there is going to be quite a while of investment with little to no return. Jut I agree, that once that hump is finally gotten over there talent that will begin to flourish in that environment will be bountiful. It can and would start to look very similar to what you get for the next level from high school talent in most of the other sports.

I don't think trying to mold soccer into the European mold of developing talent is the right choice in America. This is one place where our way of cultivating athletic talent probably would be best here in this country.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
I agree 100% with this Philly!
 
I would move the HS soccer season to Spring where it would compete with baseball & not football. This wouldn't help the short season situation you bring up but it could create a Friday night social event similar to what football has in the Fall and Basketball has in the winter.

I also think that you would have kids playing BOTH soccer & football. Now before folks laugh at me about this I remember years ago a National Team level HS soccer player moved to Cincinnati from Arizona and had to decide whether to play soccer or football at Lakota West! He had been an all state safety back in Arizona! He choose soccer and when I saw him play in a game at Fairfield there was no doubt he would have been a stud on the football field to. The kid was BIG & FAST.

BTW, dual soccer & football players would follow the old tradition of dual football & lacrosse players. Where I grew up in Western NY it was common for kids to play both sports. Don't forget that Jim Brown was a great lacrosse player to.

Finally if you want to make inroads into the urban areas this is how you do it - soccer in the spring & summer and football in the fall.
Dual sports could happen, if HS administrators would allow it. I've seen it all over the state where a player does football and soccer in the same season. This is strictly a school policy.

HS soccer does have different seasons, depending on where you are in the country. Personally, a spring in Ohio would be miserable, just look at how it was this spring. Kentucky has middle school in the spring, good luck with having a good preseason, then even more luck needed to ensure a good regular season.

Additionally, what just needs to happen is the HS state associations need to quit being restrictive. Oklahoma allows HS and club to co-exist in the same season (spring). Seemed to flow pretty smoothly, in my experience. High schools know how/when to schedule away from club schedules. There's no fighting or territorialism as much as there is when HS associations restrict everything.
 
Now that the FCC Academy teams have been selected and announced does anyone have an idea of how some of the high schools were impacted? For example, did St X lose a bunch of guys, Mason, Summit, etc?
 
So..the FCC "academy" (joke) is going to play a national schedule with lads from a couple clubs in the Cincy area? I only wish there was some way to get in on some betting action on this (stomach hurts from laughing)...I could retire soon...I will say this one more time....Club soccer is a cash cow run by men and women scamming thousands of dollars out of the pockets of middle and upper class folks so they can ride around in their SUV's with stickers that say their kid (s) play for some blah blah blah club...the soccer is awful! I have seen the highest levels...Buckeye, MRL, ODP and it was mostly small, marginally athletic kids playing a very "unphysical" game...The problem remains our most gifted, athletic kids aren't playing soccer yet...and I say this AS MY YOUNGEST IS PLAYING CLUB! ...This model will not change because the people making a living running these clubs aren't giving it up any time soon...it is easy money...it isn't about the number of high school games...it isn't about training....it is about $$$...My only jealousy is I didn't think of it!
 

Rohbino

Active member
So..the FCC "academy" (joke) is going to play a national schedule with lads from a couple clubs in the Cincy area? I only wish there was some way to get in on some betting action on this (stomach hurts from laughing)...I could retire soon..
You do realize that MLS clubs are required to have USSDA teams, don't you? FC Cincinnati doesn't have a choice here. It's either support USDDA teams or don't have a MLS franchise. All MLS teams have USSDA teams. Even the Canadian clubs, Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver, have USSDA teams.

Club soccer is a cash cow run by men and women scamming thousands of dollars out of the pockets of middle and upper class folks
I won't argue that the pay-to-play club structure probably isn't the best, but someone has to pay. The trainers are not going to do what they do for free. Would you work for free? There is a lot of overhead as well - field fees (maintenance fees if the club owns the fields or leasing/rental), administration fees, insurance, referees, etc.... Until someone can come up with a better plan, it's how it is.

On this subject, though, you should research how much the kids playing in the USSDA, which FCC is a part of, btw, are paying. Not all USSDA teams are affiliated with MLS clubs. IN Ohio the Internationals (all age groups) in Akron/Cleveland and CUP (13 & 14) in Cincinnati, are examples of clubs not affiliated with MLS clubs. Those USSDA teams that are affiliated with MLS clubs, in Ohio that would be FCC and the Columbus Crew, are also subsidized by the MLS clubs. You seem to be making a statement that the FCC families will be "on the hook" for a lot of money in order for their kids to play for a DA team. While I'm not saying that there is no cash outlay from the families, it's not what you think it is.


...the soccer is awful! I have seen the highest levels...Buckeye, MRL, ODP and it was mostly small, marginally athletic kids playing a very "unphysical" game...
Buckeye, MRL, and ODP are not what I would consider the "highest levels." For the boys the highest level is undoubtedly the DA and for the girls it is the DA and ECNL. There is a lot of good soccer being played in the leagues at those levels. Go to a game and you might be surprised. That being said, there are still some good players playing in Buckeye and MRL or in the other USYSA regional leagues. You have a lot of anger over the structure of youth soccer and your tunnel vision probably doesn't allow you to see the good players.

I'm not sure where you get your "small" observation from. Kids, and even adults, don't need to be big to play good soccer. Croatia's Luka Modric is probably 5'7" and maybe 140-150 pounds and he is one of the best players in the world. Xavi, the retired Spanish player, is probably even smaller than that. Messi? Neymar? Dani Alves? Franck Ribery? These guys are all small and among the best in the world. There are a lot more than the players I've mentioned. The history of the game is filled with small players that were great.

I'm guessing from your "small, marginally athletic kids playing a very "unphysical" game" comment that you're a parent that thinks the best form of soccer is to have minimal passing in the midfield and have the defenders boot the ball up to the big, "athletic", and fast forward. Am I right? That isn't soccer, pal.
Here we go with this mindset. 🤦‍♂️🤦‍♀️
That mindset isn't altogether wrong, though. It's probably about the only logical thing that Sports Jock wrote. There are some kids that would be good players that don't get the opportunity to play. To the credit of the MLS clubs, though, there are outreach programs that attempt to draw some of those kids in. I'm not sure how successful the programs are and if they're actually more about "appearances" and building goodwill in the community but I believe some efforts are being made.

Many kids, though, have no interest in soccer. If a kid plays football, baseball, basketball, runs track, or whatever, and is enjoying it, it's all good. Anything to keep kids away from drugs or other degenerate street life is good.
 
You do realize that MLS clubs are required to have USSDA teams, don't you? FC Cincinnati doesn't have a choice here. It's either support USDDA teams or don't have a MLS franchise. All MLS teams have USSDA teams. Even the Canadian clubs, Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver, have USSDA teams.
That requirement has no timeline though. Toronto just got theirs recently. Minnesota too. Others just bought existing clubs. MLS will allow an entity to begin, and the DA would come along...sometime.

That mindset isn't altogether wrong, though. It's probably about the only logical thing that Sports Jock wrote. There are some kids that would be good players that don't get the opportunity to play. To the credit of the MLS clubs, though, there are outreach programs that attempt to draw some of those kids in. I'm not sure how successful the programs are and if they're actually more about "appearances" and building goodwill in the community but I believe some efforts are being made.

Many kids, though, have no interest in soccer. If a kid plays football, baseball, basketball, runs track, or whatever, and is enjoying it, it's all good. Anything to keep kids away from drugs or other degenerate street life is good.
It is wrong. There's only one country that has more people playing soccer than the US, and that's China. It's not a numbers of athletes OR people problem. It's a culture problem.

What is the determination of "best athlete"? I ask that all the time when people bring this statement up. Messi would never be considered "best athlete" in the US, but he's arguably the best player in the world. It's not about being "best athlete." It's about being the "best soccer players."

Ever compare the speed or agility of our USMNT players with NFL combine participants? A lot of those numbers are extremely similar, and many better for the USMNT players. You match our NT up with any other NT, and I would be that the "athletic ability" would be similar to any other country. Compare the technical and tactical ability, that's a different story. Compare the soccer IQ, completely different.
 

Rohbino

Active member
What is the determination of "best athlete"? I ask that all the time when people bring this statement up. Messi would never be considered "best athlete" in the US, but he's arguably the best player in the world. It's not about being "best athlete." It's about being the "best soccer players."

Ever compare the speed or agility of our USMNT players with NFL combine participants? A lot of those numbers are extremely similar, and many better for the USMNT players. You match our NT up with any other NT, and I would be that the "athletic ability" would be similar to any other country. Compare the technical and tactical ability, that's a different story. Compare the soccer IQ, completely different.
You make a fair and valid point. It's kind of where I was going with my comments above in regard to "small players." In rereading what I wrote, I didn't finish my thoughts.

I will contend, though, and perhaps it may have been where Sports Jock was going, is that there are probably many kids that would be decent players that miss out on the opportunity because it is too elusive and quality instruction is not attainable.
 
.
Top