Does Competing at Indoor Meets Help Outdoor Season?

Every years some teams run large number of kids in lots of indoor meets while other high schools run very few or no indoor meets. What impact does indoor meets have on outdoor result?

To me competing from early January until early June seems like a long season particularly for high school kids that that did either football or cross country.
 

JAVMAN83

Active member
The answer is: It depends.

With regard to the length of the season, just look at HS football. There are programs already doing Winter/Spring football lifting. Of course, not officially, but the kids are nevertheless doing so with coaches "awareness".

Now when I was a young buck decades ago, I competed from mid-January until mid-July, and had I had the early December meets available then, I would've started in December and not thought twice about it. I completely ate it up and every meet was like Play Day to me.

With regard to structure of scheduling for coaches, early season meets are a great way to observe fitness levels of various athletes if not already known. It is also a great opportunity to get kids who have little-to-no experience in various events, particularly field events, to gain competency and confidence in competing in low-key opportunities that are few-and-far between these days with lack of dual/triangular meets of recent decades. Go for it.

Now with respect to experienced athletes that have already gone through grueling schedules during the summer/fall preceding, then I'd focus more on training than competing. Maybe a meet or two. However, you can't tell a kid he can't compete if he/she really loves it. No one could've ever told me no.

So, there's a quick look at the subject.
 
Just to be clear that training this time a year is a very good thing along with some fitness test races. The skill events such as PV, throws and jumps(?) were repetition is helpful it is good to compete as often as possible. I just wonder about max effort in multiply races most weekends of Jan and Feb that some of them do.

I guess that it does just depend on the athlete, their training, competition history and events.

Maybe the better question is do the best HS programs in the state have their kids to a handful or more indoor meets and do they only do a couple or even none?
 

ccrunner609

Active member
Just to be clear that training this time a year is a very good thing along with some fitness test races. The skill events such as PV, throws and jumps(?) were repetition is helpful it is good to compete as often as possible. I just wonder about max effort in multiply races most weekends of Jan and Feb that some of them do.

I guess that it does just depend on the athlete, their training, competition history and events.

Maybe the better question is do the best HS programs in the state have their kids to a handful or more indoor meets and do they only do a couple or even none?
I find that most track events are under performed due to kids only doing those events during the season. The more racing and race variance a kid can get the better.
 
Kids love to compete. Let them compete. That's why most of them are doing the sport. Many distance runners start training again in December after a post-XC break. Can you imagine the boredom of training for four months (Dec. to March) without any competition? Perhaps the most hardcore kids can do that. Most 16-year-olds can't.
 
Kids love to compete. Let them compete. That's why most of them are doing the sport. Many distance runners start training again in December after a post-XC break. Can you imagine the boredom of training for four months (Dec. to March) without any competition? Perhaps the most hardcore kids can do that. Most 16-year-olds can't.
I completely agree with this just looking for others thoughts as to the impact on it has on outdoor season. HS sports should first be enjoyed so if kids want to do run indoors they should. So I hope my questions were not interpreted as anti-indoor.
 
In my years of coaching, we've had years where we didn't run indoor at all, and years in which we ran several meets (3-4, tops). I'm not sure I've seen a measurable difference in how our distance kids performed by May. Of course, my focus is usually on the longer distance races. I can see how running hurdles, or long jumping, or pole vaulting, or high jumping could benefit from the repetition of competing a lot in the winter.
 

ccrunner609

Active member
reps in events that require skills like starts or field events surely help. Distance kids can surely race road races and other things to make up for not racing at all for 4 months
 

ghsknightsfan

Well-known member
I have seen it help more-so with field events that running events. but it's nice to have the athletes competing in my opinion. 4-5 meets a winter is a nice number, with practice once or twice a week. doesn't wear them out before the season, but keeps them in condition and is just extra work (and some fun, which is very important!)
 
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