College scholarship

olivia jo

Active member
How much in scholarship money does a wrestler get when receiving a Div.1 or 2 offer? I have heard so many different amounts and percentages.
 

Suplexer130

Active member
How much in scholarship money does a wrestler get when receiving a Div.1 or 2 offer? I have heard so many different amounts and percentages.
The reason you hear so many numbers is because there is no set amount. Most “revenue” sports are full scholarship sports meaning if you’re offered a scholarship it’s a full scholarship. Non-revenue sports such as wrestling can offer partials in and sort of increment they’d like to. Not sure if still the same but D1 used to be 9.9 scholarships for the entire team and D2 I think was 9.
 

scbuckeye99

Active member
Having been through the process several times as others have mentioned there is no set scenario.

I had a kid in the class of 2019 who signed his LOI with a public university in North Carolina (SOCON school) and received nothing more than textbook money. He was a 4x SQ and 3x placer. He transferred to a D2 program after one semester of sitting deep on the depth chart. His wrestling resume was really good / not great, his grades and test scores were the definition of average (took 3 tries to get an 18 on the ACT). He had interest from places such as Bucknell....until they found out his grades and test scores.

Have a kid who just graduated (class of 2020) who was a 2x State Champ, graduated with honors, earned the highly coveted International Baccalaureate Diploma (his last 2 years of high school he took only AP / IB courses) scored a good not great ACT and received a full-ride to wrestle at a private D1 school in North Carolina. His full-ride is roughly 90% academic however. The college coach simply "found" the other 10% to fill in the gap.

Have had several kids go D2 over the years who as freshman received nothing more than book money plus whatever academic and r need based aid their first semester and then after the first semester the coach would reevaluate their financial situation. That "situation" almost always came down to how they did academically their first semester and then they looked at their mat progress. Now I should point out these were kids who were multi-time State Qualifiers but not State Champions.

I will also say this lastly. Unlike big time football and basketball, olympic sport coaches are given some wiggle room when it comes to a recruits academic profile when compared to the general student academic profile but not nearly as much as Coach Day, Coach K, Dabo and Saban. There was a kid down here in South Carolina 20 years ago who was a 4x State Champ, absolute stud on the mat but an absolute dud in the classroom. Had several Big10 coaches come calling until they got a look at his transcript and test scores. They told this kid in so many words there was no way they could get him admitted into their university unless he played football or basketball.
 

olivia jo

Active member
Having been through the process several times as others have mentioned there is no set scenario.

I had a kid in the class of 2019 who signed his LOI with a public university in North Carolina (SOCON school) and received nothing more than textbook money. He was a 4x SQ and 3x placer. He transferred to a D2 program after one semester of sitting deep on the depth chart. His wrestling resume was really good / not great, his grades and test scores were the definition of average (took 3 tries to get an 18 on the ACT). He had interest from places such as Bucknell....until they found out his grades and test scores.

Have a kid who just graduated (class of 2020) who was a 2x State Champ, graduated with honors, earned the highly coveted International Baccalaureate Diploma (his last 2 years of high school he took only AP / IB courses) scored a good not great ACT and received a full-ride to wrestle at a private D1 school in North Carolina. His full-ride is roughly 90% academic however. The college coach simply "found" the other 10% to fill in the gap.

Have had several kids go D2 over the years who as freshman received nothing more than book money plus whatever academic and r need based aid their first semester and then after the first semester the coach would reevaluate their financial situation. That "situation" almost always came down to how they did academically their first semester and then they looked at their mat progress. Now I should point out these were kids who were multi-time State Qualifiers but not State Champions.

I will also say this lastly. Unlike big time football and basketball, olympic sport coaches are given some wiggle room when it comes to a recruits academic profile when compared to the general student academic profile but not nearly as much as Coach Day, Coach K, Dabo and Saban. There was a kid down here in South Carolina 20 years ago who was a 4x State Champ, absolute stud on the mat but an absolute dud in the classroom. Had several Big10 coaches come calling until they got a look at his transcript and test scores. They told this kid in so many words there was no way they could get him admitted into their university unless he played football or basketball.
Thats the best analogy of scholarship wrestling ,i have read .Thanks
 
Top 5 rank in country, college will get full ride if you fit program needs. Redshirt and even grey shirt to get u academically ready. 6-10 becomes more complicated, grades and Act are big factors. Then they need to figure out how to get your money. Part athletic and rest academic. Then if a coach likes a particular wrestler things can happen. This is the Division 1 big program basics imo.

All others you better have the grades and Act score to get money. This doesn't necessarily mean there aren't other routes to score money, but no grades and Act means no money. Just my opinion

If a kid really loves wrestling he will find a way to wrestle in college. It may be a d3 open tournament, but they will be given a chance. The rest is up to them.
 
Every school is different...every division is different. Most schools wrestling programs are NOT fully funded...meaning the NCAA allows a school to give 9.9 scholarships, but the university only funds 3 or whatever it is for them.

My kid got "offers" from D2, D3, & NAIA schools within our region...all of them structured differently...and quite interestingly structured to be honest. Academic money was double the wrestling money in all of these cases. "C's get Degree's", but they ain't getting you a penny when you need it to get in the door.
 

Suplexer130

Active member
Every school is different...every division is different. Most schools wrestling programs are NOT fully funded...meaning the NCAA allows a school to give 9.9 scholarships, but the university only funds 3 or whatever it is for them.

My kid got "offers" from D2, D3, & NAIA schools within our region...all of them structured differently...and quite interestingly structured to be honest. Academic money was double the wrestling money in all of these cases. "C's get Degree's", but they ain't getting you a penny when you need it to get in the door.
To expand on this, one thing I found interesting was some schools counted academic money against the athletic scholarship amount. Meaning if a kid received 5k a year from the school for academic money they counted that against the wrestling team's scholarship amount. This wasn't an NCAA rule but rather how that school's accounting department wanted to handle passing money out to students. I had a coach once tell me they wanted dumb kid with rich parents to fill their roster because if they filled it with a bunch of smart kids they'd not have any money left to offer for athletics because the school applied academic money against the sports total allotment.

There are a lot of weird intricacies from division to division, but also from school to school.
 

scbuckeye99

Active member
To expand on this, one thing I found interesting was some schools counted academic money against the athletic scholarship amount. Meaning if a kid received 5k a year from the school for academic money they counted that against the wrestling team's scholarship amount. This wasn't an NCAA rule but rather how that school's accounting department wanted to handle passing money out to students. I had a coach once tell me they wanted dumb kid with rich parents to fill their roster because if they filled it with a bunch of smart kids they'd not have any money left to offer for athletics because the school applied academic money against the sports total allotment.

There are a lot of weird intricacies from division to division, but also from school to school.
Furman University (FCS football) does something like this that is out of left field. At Furman you can only get "either or". Meaning you can not get BOTH academic and athletic. So if you get $20k in academic versus $10k in athletic you'd obviously take the $20k in academic. I would imagine that leaves the door open for them to offer full athletic rides to the recruits they are really wanting. Or at least the ones they are willing to push a ton of athletic aid towards. This was what made people down here scratch their heads when Furman made the announcement to discontinue their baseball and lacrosse programs. Speaking with Furman alums they were puzzled as to why a sport that was being funded through academic merit and parent's own pockets got the axe???
 

Latman

Member
To expand on this, one thing I found interesting was some schools counted academic money against the athletic scholarship amount. Meaning if a kid received 5k a year from the school for academic money they counted that against the wrestling team's scholarship amount. This wasn't an NCAA rule but rather how that school's accounting department wanted to handle passing money out to students. I had a coach once tell me they wanted dumb kid with rich parents to fill their roster because if they filled it with a bunch of smart kids they'd not have any money left to offer for athletics because the school applied academic money against the sports total allotment.

There are a lot of weird intricacies from division to division, but also from school to school.
Going through the process this past year, our family experienced similar. A certain D1 school said a certain GPA with a certain ACT score or lower would result in the academic scholarship money being offered to count against the wrestling scholarship dollars. I believe they wanted an ACT score of 26 or higher to have the academic scholarship dollars to not count against the wrestling dollars.
 

scbuckeye99

Active member
Coolguy is spot on. My son received academic & wrestling at a NAIA school (3x academic to wrestling $). All my kids took the ACT test 2 or 3 times - paid for ACT coaching for all three, best return on investment I ever made to get academic funding.
Out of pure curiosity how much was the ACT coaching? What all did it involve (Time, energy, etc...)?
 
Out of pure curiosity how much was the ACT coaching? What all did it involve (Time, energy, etc...)?

Depends...it's like most things...you get what you pay for. Coaching friend paid for an online program for his daughter..they had a goal score to reach...I don't recall what he paid, but it was not at the high end of what I found. She hit her score so it was worth every penny for them. There is a lady in Cincy that is well known for getting elite academic kids big time results...like kids getting from 31 to the 34 35 range. She has multiple perfect score kids per year...She doesn't take a 23 to a 33, but still.. Here is her link... http://www.educationfortesting.com She runs classes (every sat and/or Sunday) that last 4 weeks, 7 weeks, or 10 weeks...depends on what your goal is. Yep...some kids commit 10 weeks worth of weekends to hit their target score. This lady is Da MAN when it comes to this stuff in Cincy area. Maybe there are others??? I am sure that every larger city has someone who runs a program like this. Ms. Geller does her classes at UC Blue Ash. It was out of my price range (so I thought) but in reality...This is where I should have sent all 3 even if I had to drag them in there.

My sons used the ACT prep stuff from home . Mixed results as all three of my sons are VERY different. Wish I had sent all three for off campus ACT prep....It (should) pay for itself 10x over in year 1 in my opinion.

I have 1 child left...She WILL use a quality ACT Prep course that is apart from whatever the school offers at that time...starting in 10th grade at the latest. ACT is where your gold comes from. People will line up like birds on a beach to pay silly money for wrestling clubs, $200 shoes, $400 bats, Jordan shoes, Fargo $1200 2-3 times in a career etc...but balk at paying someone to help their child get that ACT score they want or need. (I did too)

Most schools post their sliding scale of GPA/ACT scholarship money...play around with it...you will find for many schools the GPA is less important than the ACT in their cost calculator.

Good Luck...and sign them up for ACT class.
 

scbuckeye99

Active member
Depends...it's like most things...you get what you pay for. Coaching friend paid for an online program for his daughter..they had a goal score to reach...I don't recall what he paid, but it was not at the high end of what I found. She hit her score so it was worth every penny for them. There is a lady in Cincy that is well known for getting elite academic kids big time results...like kids getting from 31 to the 34 35 range. She has multiple perfect score kids per year...She doesn't take a 23 to a 33, but still.. Here is her link... http://www.educationfortesting.com She runs classes (every sat and/or Sunday) that last 4 weeks, 7 weeks, or 10 weeks...depends on what your goal is. Yep...some kids commit 10 weeks worth of weekends to hit their target score. This lady is Da MAN when it comes to this stuff in Cincy area. Maybe there are others??? I am sure that every larger city has someone who runs a program like this. Ms. Geller does her classes at UC Blue Ash. It was out of my price range (so I thought) but in reality...This is where I should have sent all 3 even if I had to drag them in there.

My sons used the ACT prep stuff from home . Mixed results as all three of my sons are VERY different. Wish I had sent all three for off campus ACT prep....It (should) pay for itself 10x over in year 1 in my opinion.

I have 1 child left...She WILL use a quality ACT Prep course that is apart from whatever the school offers at that time...starting in 10th grade at the latest. ACT is where your gold comes from. People will line up like birds on a beach to pay silly money for wrestling clubs, $200 shoes, $400 bats, Jordan shoes, Fargo $1200 2-3 times in a career etc...but balk at paying someone to help their child get that ACT score they want or need. (I did too)

Most schools post their sliding scale of GPA/ACT scholarship money...play around with it...you will find for many schools the GPA is less important than the ACT in their cost calculator.

Good Luck...and sign them up for ACT class.
Good deal. Yea, you read my mind. I'm always amazed how much money parents dump into camps, equipment, travel teams in all sports when if they put that sort of money into test prep programs they'd get way more ROI when it came time to pay tuition / room / board, etc.....
 
Good deal. Yea, you read my mind. I'm always amazed how much money parents dump into camps, equipment, travel teams in all sports when if they put that sort of money into test prep programs they'd get way more ROI when it came time to pay tuition / room / board, etc.....
Good deal. Yea, you read my mind. I'm always amazed how much money parents dump into camps, equipment, travel teams in all sports when if they put that sort of money into test prep programs they'd get way more ROI when it came time to pay tuition / room / board, etc.....
You and several other posters are correct. IMO Act is the bible. I'm not a fan of test. I prefer progress and hardworking students. BUT that's not the system. I'm amazed how there seems to be a huge lack of education about the rules. But topics like these are very important for wrestling parents.
 

scbuckeye99

Active member
You and several other posters are correct. IMO Act is the bible. I'm not a fan of test. I prefer progress and hardworking students. BUT that's not the system. I'm amazed how there seems to be a huge lack of education about the rules. But topics like these are very important for wrestling parents.
Agreed.
 
When I was in high school I raised my ACT score by two points just by checking a prep book out from the library. It had some helpful hints that worked the second time I took it. This only works if the student is self-motivated enough to read the book on their own time, but it costs $0 to do.
 

need tickets

New member
Like people have said previously, it is all about the academics. I had my son taking the ACT when he was in junior high. I would start taking that test as early as possible. Buy the online prep books sold by the ACT. Xavier University has an excellent ACT prep for high schoolers. Go down to the college and post a notice in the dorm for a math/English tutor. If your kid is in elementary school, I would start obsessing about it right now.
 
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