Bored Coach Thread - Offense

If you're really bored you should jump online and purchase this book:

 
If you're really bored you should jump online and purchase this book:


or these:



The use of footnotes in both of these books should go down in history as the best use of footnotes in any book ever written ever.
 
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TrueEagle

New member
Personel. One team may have 5 kids on the floor all 6 feet tall and can handle the ball equally well, the other may have one 7 footer, two 6'7" and two 5'5". Both could run the same offense, but I would think a 2-3 zone or at the very least hedge and give back man defense would be important the team with variable sized players.

The team comprised of equal sized players should be able to play man defense and switch screens with little consequence.

On the AAU team I helped with we had a couple kids that whenever they were on the floor we played 3-2 zone. Otherwise , man to man.
Which is one of the things wrong with AAU. How about teaching them to guard?
 

TrueEagle

New member
Well said and so true. Team success offensively is about basketball skill. great spacing, good shooting on the perimeter off of the catch without having to put the ball on the floor, great off the ball screens to create open looks and a post player who has been taught post moves. The slowest way to move the ball is the dribble and the fastest way to move the ball is a pass.
True, but the best offense emphasizes getting layups. Guards that get in the paint. Players who go to the basket. Shoot open threes off penetration. A good offense allows all of this. Spacing is huge.
 

Tallone

Active member
True, but the best offense emphasizes getting layups. Guards that get in the paint. Players who go to the basket. Shoot open threes off penetration. A good offense allows all of this. Spacing is huge.
I would agree with you to a point. The quickest way to get in the paint or to the basket is a great pass to the post and teaching post players how to make a move.. Ball movement not dribble drive. Ball movement and player movement and knowing how to screen away from the ball. But everyone has their own opinion. Just some food for thought
 

yakyak

Well-known member
I would agree with you to a point. The quickest way to get in the paint or to the basket is a great pass to the post and teaching post players how to make a move.. Ball movement not dribble drive. Ball movement and player movement and knowing how to screen away from the ball. But everyone has their own opinion. Just some food for thought
Uhnfortunatley, post moves are dying.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
Which is one of the things wrong with AAU. How about teaching them to guard?
Most of our team was comprised of GCL players, defense was not a problem. Few games would the opponet have more than 20 points at the half, and usually 12-14 was more common.

Teaching them to close out properly was our biggest defensive hurdle. That occurs whether man or zone.
 

spirit454

Active member
Then why were you playing zone every time those couple kids went on the floor is defense was not an issue?

Most of our team was comprised of GCL players, defense was not a problem. Few games would the opponet have more than 20 points at the half, and usually 12-14 was more common.

Teaching them to close out properly was our biggest defensive hurdle. That occurs whether man or zone.
 

TrueEagle

New member
I would agree with you to a point. The quickest way to get in the paint or to the basket is a great pass to the post and teaching post players how to make a move.. Ball movement not dribble drive. Ball movement and player movement and knowing how to screen away from the ball. But everyone has their own opinion. Just some food for thought
You’re ignoring all the effort, and time, it takes to get the ball to a spot where you can feed the post successfully. When you consider that, dribble penetration is much quicker. This is not to say that based on your talent a post up offense isn’t the best choice.
 

yakyak

Well-known member
Most of our team was comprised of GCL players, defense was not a problem. Few games would the opponet have more than 20 points at the half, and usually 12-14 was more common.

Teaching them to close out properly was our biggest defensive hurdle. That occurs whether man or zone.
Close outs are so important in todays game. So many kids can handle the ball now and train on the pivot sequence compare to 20 years ago. You are going to have to close out dealing with an array of skilled ball handlers. Everyone also shoots it, again making close out super critical. Very underrated skill that takes a ton of athleticism and technique to do correctly.
 

yakyak

Well-known member
You’re ignoring all the effort, and time, it takes to get the ball to a spot where you can feed the post successfully. When you consider that, dribble penetration is much quicker. This is not to say that based on your talent a post up offense isn’t the best choice.
And if you do happen to get it in there (no one knows post entry techiniques) your likely getting it to a player who can only turn over one shoulder and shoot it. Very limited feet anymore with the post folks. Girls are far supieror post players now than the guys, a part of the game I miss.

But, its interesting, watch how much post happens in the nba playoffs and deep march games. Its still a very easy way to score.
 
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Tallone

Active member
You’re ignoring all the effort, and time, it takes to get the ball to a spot where you can feed the post successfully. When you consider that, dribble penetration is much quicker. This is not to say that based on your talent a post up offense isn’t the best choice.
As I said, just a thought. If a coach knows how to teach team offense properly, the fastest player dribbling cannot and never will be faster than a pass. Also you have to teach post moves to make it effective. As I said ,everybody has different philosophies
 
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D4fan

Well-known member
Then why were you playing zone every time those couple kids went on the floor is defense was not an issue?
Those two kids each had attributes where they were great near the basket but if little value in the open court. They were big with slow feet. A 6' guard is going to eat up a 7'post player in the open court, especially if the 7' kid is not very agile.
 

1 time

Active member
Wrong. Players fault. Kids do not want to spend the time in the off season on it. It takes a lot more than in season practice time to create a skill
Most don’t want to spend time on anything but jacking up 3’s. When November practice rolls around 2-3 people are working in the post. That’s not optional from a coach.
 

1 time

Active member
You’re ignoring all the effort, and time, it takes to get the ball to a spot where you can feed the post successfully. When you consider that, dribble penetration is much quicker. This is not to say that based on your talent a post up offense isn’t the best choice.
There
There’s no shot clock. You pounded them if you can
 

spirit454

Active member
Those two kids each had attributes where they were great near the basket but if little value in the open court. They were big with slow feet. A 6' guard is going to eat up a 7'post player in the open court, especially if the 7' kid is not very agile.
If you are not going to teach them what they don't know then don't recruit them to play for you in the spring and summer.
 

yakyak

Well-known member
Most don’t want to spend time on anything but jacking up 3’s. When November practice rolls around 2-3 people are working in the post. That’s not optional from a coach.
Cant argue with you there for sure. You go back , kids did enjoy working in the post. Not saying its bad, I love the state of the modern game. But I do miss another layer of scoring. But, its really still there. A lot of post touches in colleges and I think it will come back a bit in the pros will realize what an efficient (energy, technique) way it is to score. Post defense is horrendous anymore, you can really take advantage of folks down there. The biggest issues is guards are done throwing entry passes, I will just go get mine. :-(

The greatest scores of all time have been back to the basket scores (Jordan, Kareem). Durant most deadly move, elbow catch one dribble, baseline jumper, is really a modern post up. Lebron in Game 7's goes to the post. Its still there. It is just a lot more enjoyable working on dribble sequences to pull ups 30 footers (o_O) then one pivot in both directions.
 
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