Black History Month : Name the Greatest African-American Football Players from Ohio

hsfan60

Well-known member

HardCorps

Well-known member
I'm kind of biased as a kid who grew up watching Cris Carter. He's a hall of famer and one of the best all-round athletes to come out of SW Ohio. He also led the Middletown basketball team to the state championship game and won multiple state championships in track. With that being said, Orlando Pace is arguably one of the best left tackles to ever play the game and was a vital member of the "Greatest Show on Turf". It hard for me to argue against him as the best player from Ohio. When I was in high school, we had some game film of an upcoming opponent and we keep watching this defensive end just get killed by this offensive tackle from the other team. We're all kind of snickering and laughing and the coach figured out why. He warned us that the DE was actually a really good player that was headed to some MAC school and not to underestimate him. The guy blocking him was going to OSU and was one of the best players in the country. Being dumb kids, we just kind of blew it off, thought "yeah right" were going to kill this dude. The DE ended up with about a dozen tackles, a sack and several tackles for a loss. We won 9-0 but it wasn't for lack of a defensive effort by the other team. The OT we were watching ended up being Orlando Pace and he must have pancaked that kid a dozen times. We all ended up being pretty big fans of his afterwards.
How did you like going to Wade E Miller for a big game and watching Carter?
 

NewOldBlood

Well-known member
How did you like going to Wade E Miller for a big game and watching Carter?
I was young 4th or 5th grade, but it was always exciting. To be honest, I loved the old Miller Gym and really hated to see it go. Based on high school, I would have thought basketball was going to Carter's thing. He was just an unbelievable athlete.
 

HardCorps

Well-known member
I was young 4th or 5th grade, but it was always exciting. To be honest, I loved the old Miller Gym and really hated to see it go. Based on high school, I would have thought basketball was going to Carter's thing. He was just an unbelievable athlete.
I was about the same age. Dad would take me and it was always sold out. Carter would bring the house down for sure. When I got out of the military I moved back and went to watch many big games at Wade E. A tremendous venue for sure. The best in my estimation.
 

FirestoneFan

Well-known member
One of the best I ever played against was Harold Brown from Ravenna back in the late 70's. Big, fast and very quick. He got a scholarship to OSU but suffered a broken neck in a game against Nordonia (I think) but Woody still honored his scholarship. I do think he transfered to Oklahoma State and played a little there.
 

hsfan60

Well-known member
Totally agree, besides that the team was well balanced and great defense "Toledo slant 50", blood end.
The 1969 Toledo Rockets football team was an American football team that represented the University of Toledo in the Mid-American Conference (MAC) during the 1969 college football season. In their seventh season under head coach Frank Lauterbur, the Rockets compiled an 11–0 record (6–0 against MAC opponents), outscored all opponents by a combined total of 385 to 160, and won the MAC championship. The season began with a 45–18 victory over Villanova and concluded with a 56–33 victory over Southern Conference champion Davidson in the 1969 Tangerine Bowl. The Rockets were ranked No. 20 in the final AP Poll.[1][2] The defense led the way for the 1969 team, allowing only eight rushing touchdowns and intercepting 22 passes in eleven games.[3]
The 1969 season marked the beginning of a 35-game winning streak that consisted of three consecutive seasons from 1969 through 1971. During the streak, Toledo won three consecutive MAC championships and three consecutive bowl games, led the nation in total defense all three years, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 1,152 to 344.[4] It remains the second longest winning streak in modern Division I-A college football history behind Oklahoma's 47-game streak in the 1950s.[5]
Cornerback Curtis Johnson, who intercepted seven passes in 1969,[6] received first-team All-America honors from the Newspaper Enterprise Association and second-team honors from the Associated Press.[7][8] Eight Toledo players received first-team All-MAC honors: Curtis Johnson, quarterback Chuck Ealey, tailback Tony Harris, defensive tackles Mel Long and Jim Rance, defensive end Jim Tyler, linebacker John Niezgoda, and placekicker Ken Krots.[9]
Chuck Ealey was named MAC Back of the Year, and Frank Lauterbur was named MAC Coach of the Year.[10] Ken Crots, who converted six of 18 field goal attempts,[11] won the Jim Nicholson Award as the player contributing the most to the team's success.[12] The team captains were Curtis Johnson, Dave Penn, and Jim Rance.[13]
The team's statistical leaders included Chuck Ealey with 1,428 passing yards, Tony Harris with 889 rushing yards (including 217 in the season opener against Villanova), Don Fair with 469 receiving yards, Charles Cole with 78 points scored, and John Niezgoda with 201 tackles.[14]
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
If you are going to copy and paste info from a source;
you should at least credit the source!

:>---

SALT
There's a lot of lazy regards that. Some even to get around pay-walls. At least it was an open source wiki, not a private source. I prefer links with paraphrase, which I believe is considered legit?
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Maybe Opup is a journalist, IDK but he's right. People are copy-pasting whole articles; that's someone's work. Wiki, I'm not sure what the English teachers would say but paraphrase or link is probably on the safe side of fair.
 
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