Bellevue Girls outa control...hair pulling video

StSebastian

Active member
I missed this earlier but what a ridiculous take... so no senior should get to enjoy one small moment of what otherwise typically was a terrible end to their senior season and possibly career because they have a condition or injury that doesn't allow them on the floor? When these situations are set-up, there are literally no other players near them on the floor and all precautions are taken to ensure the health of the athlete. This is commonly done for kids and it is a mark of great character and great sportsmanship, not this twisted view that you took.
TECHNICALLY, Hitnrun is correct in his take on the OHSAA Return to Play Protocol after sustaining a concussion. However, there is not an OHSAA "violation" or "consequence" for doing so... It could POTENTIALLY be MUCH MORE serious than that. It is actually a state law and guided by NFHS playing rules... meaning, if something would have happened to her while she was in the game (notwithstanding intent and caution) all parties would be subject to litigation...

This is entirely different than a typical "injury" that you refer to like an athlete rehabbing from an ACL tear or other major physical injury / surgery. Head injuries, particularly concussions, are significantly different as indicated by a specific state law and guidelines set forth by the NFHS and OHSAA to return to play.

BUT I do understand the point you are making. The athlete and parents are free to allow this to happen HOWEVER... this is a VERY RISKY move for the school unless they fulfilled the following or have no problem paying court costs if they were to be sued which in this particular situation, I HIGHLY doubt anyone makes a big deal about it. You just never know...


OHSAA Concussion Protocol

...the coach or contest officials shall not permit the student to return to practice or competition until both of the following conditions are satisfied:

1) The student’s condition is assessed by either of the following:

a. A physician, who is a person authorized under Chapter 4731 of the Ohio Revised Code (OCR) to practice medicine and surgery or osteopathic medicine or surgery (M.D. or D.O.)

b. Any other licensed health care provider that the school district board of education or other governing authority of a chartered or non-chartered nonpublic school, authorizes to assess the student who has been removed from practice or competition.

2) The student receives written authorization that it is safe for the student to return to practice or competition from a physician or other licensed health care provider authorized to grant the clearance.
 
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Red14

Active member
I don't want to speak negatively about any of the other players in District 6 - Division 2, but something really bugged me this weekend when I saw it....

For Casey Santoro to not be voted District 6 POY - by the coaches in her district, because of this incident - is just wrong.

Every single player and coach in District 6 has made mistakes during the past 4 years.
- Were any of them as "bad" as Casey's?
- Could any of them have hurt someone like Casey did?
- Did they show more sincere remorse than Casey did?
Obviously each person can only answer that for themselves, but clearly Casey's mistake had the most media coverage and outrage.

With that being said - Casey was easily the best player in District 6 this year. It wasn't even close. Everyone who watched Bellevue knows this.
The coaches should be ashamed for taking an award (and also N-S game status, since she didn't get POY) away from a player for an on-court incident - which she was punished for. Whether or not everyone thinks that missing 2 games is enough or not - Casey missed 2 games - the same as if she were ejected from the game.

We should re-name the District 6 POY Award - "The District 6 PC POY Award" or "The District 6 Top Player Who Didn't Ball Us Out and Enrage Us For 4 Years Award".

I sure hope that the moral police and those whose opinions on character and decisions later on in life don't find things to crucify all of those coaches.

***Also - for the record, I literally have no connection to Bellevue or the Santoro family at all and I am not sure if two games was enough for what she did.***
I think after an incident like this, the mercy shown by the victim and the lack of harsh discipline, I think the player and her fans should just take the high road and not be concerned with any individual honors. She's fortunate that she wasn't suspended for multiple games, including the rest of the season. This was a sad situation and was mishandled by many people. The people who are in charge of controlling these things (coach, administration) failed miserably in my opinion.
 

Red14

Active member
I only heard of this from afar, and I'm curious. For anyone that's remotely close to this situation, was there any history between these two kids, anything happen earlier in the game that escalated to this? I find it really odd that this just "happened". These things do happen at times, but generally there is a push or shove earlier in the game, some trashtalking, etc. I'm assuming these kids, since they in the same conference and both are the same age, have played against each other several times over the years.
 
Not sure about anything earlier in the game, but if you watch closely at the beginning of the clip as the two teams are milling around waiting for the inbounds, you can see the Bellevue player in question give a shoulder into the same Norwalk kid she seconds later pulls down by the hair. After giving her the shoulder in the middle of the key, the Norwalk girl holds her hands out as if to say "what the heck...". So something was brewing.
New York Post video.
Just an observation.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
TECHNICALLY, Hitnrun is correcet in his take on the OHSAA Return to Play Protocol after sustaining a concussion. However, there is not an OHSAA "violation" or "consequence" for doing so... It could POTENTIALLY be MUCH MORE serious than that. It is actually a state law and guided by NFHS playing rules... meaning, if something would have happened to her while she was in the game (notwithstanding intent and caution) all parties would be subject to litigation...

This is entirely different than a typical "injury" that you refer to like an athlete rehabbing from and ACL tear or other major physical injury / surgery. Head injuries, particularly concussions, are significantly different as indicated by a specific state law and guidelines set forth by the NFHS and OHSAA to return to play.

BUT I do understand the point you are making. The athlete and parents are free to allow this to happen HOWEVER... this is a VERY RISKY move for the school unless they fulfilled the following or have no problem paying court costs if they were to be sued which in this particular situation, I HIGHLY doubt anyone makes a big deal about it. You just never know...


OHSAA Concussion Protocol

...the coach or contest officials shall not permit the student to return to practice or competition until both of the following conditions are satisfied:

1) The student’s condition is assessed by either of the following:

a. A physician, who is a person authorized under Chapter 4731 of the Ohio Revised Code (OCR) to practice medicine and surgery or osteopathic medicine or surgery (M.D. or D.O.)

b. Any other licensed health care provider that the school district board of education or other governing authority of a chartered or non-chartered nonpublic school, authorizes to assess the student who has been removed from practice or competition.

2) The student receives written authorization that it is safe for the student to return to practice or competition from a physician or other licensed health care provider authorized to grant the clearance.
I would like to hear the argument in court that a wide open layup, unguarded constitutes a "return to competition ". You make a very good point as to opening up potential liability especially if things were to go downhill from here ( I pray not the case) and her became bitter and saught retribution. I am paranoid about such possibilities now you gave me one more s scenerio to consider. I tell my kids all the time, sometimes it costs to be nice or no good deed goes unpunished.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I would like to hear the argument in court that a wide open layup, unguarded constitutes a "return to competition ". You make a very good point as to opening up potential liability especially if things were to go downhill from here ( I pray not the case) and her became bitter and saught retribution. I am paranoid about such possibilities now you gave me one more s scenerio to consider. I tell my kids all the time, sometimes it costs to be nice or no good deed goes unpunished.
I think he makes a fair point. It's a physical activity, anything could happen particularly if the head ain't right. As far as awards I think in these cases responsibility gets balanced. The parents would share the blame. It would for sure be one of those decisions that wouldn't make anyone with sense happy.

Fortunately, nothing happened.
 

Kballer

Well-known member
I only heard of this from afar, and I'm curious. For anyone that's remotely close to this situation, was there any history between these two kids, anything happen earlier in the game that escalated to this? I find it really odd that this just "happened". These things do happen at times, but generally there is a push or shove earlier in the game, some trashtalking, etc. I'm assuming these kids, since they in the same conference and both are the same age, have played against each other several times over the years.
I hear what you are saying, my daughter had certain girls in her league that she had bad blood with from years of playing multiple games against (in younger leagues and AAU). It always brought a little something extra to those rivalry games- things could get a little spicy. But- things never got to the point of intentionally hurting someone. We have seen it happen- one girl was known for falling into girl’s knees, another for the hard elbow to the ribs on every possession, one for the “accidental” face smashing on rebounds. The post on twitter with her sisters liking/sharing It, coupled by her dad/coach doing nothing about it makes it pretty clear This is the way this family operates. They were proud of her for doing this, clearly this is not the first time she has behaved violently- just The worst she’s been caught. The Norwalk parents are saints- I wouldn’t have been so magnanimous if it had been my kid.
 

CasualFan24

Active member
I think he makes a fair point. It's a physical activity, anything could happen particularly if the head ain't right. As far as awards I think in these cases responsibility gets balanced. The parents would share the blame. It would for sure be one of those decisions that wouldn't make anyone with sense happy.

Fortunately, nothing happened.
Unfortunately this is not how court cases involving medical situations actually work. A head injury like someone already mentioned is a different animal. Someone with a severe head injury could collapse or even die just walking down the hallway. In most of the cases where I've seen a player at the high school level get a concussion - the doctor does not permit them to return to SCHOOL for several days, let alone walk out onto the basketball court. If that player would have collapsed on the court during those 2 shots she was provided, the parents would have shared ZERO liability in that situation (Think about the person that sued McDonald's because they spilled coffee on themselves and got burned). The parents likely would be suing the school, the coach, and the medical professional that cleared their daughter to enter that game (IF the medical professional was even consulted about this).....Like you said though, I'm sure anyone with any type of sense wouldn't be happy - like the McDonald's situation I referenced, common sense gets thrown out the window in those types of situations...

It stinks - senior night, then tournament games starting just after this incident....but there is no chance she should have been on that court doing anything until she was cleared from concussion protocol. NFHS & OHSAA have zero tolerance when it comes to concussions - in order for that player to have started and gotten those 2 shots, the school would have needed a waiver from OHSAA - and OHSAA would have never granted it.....
 

Red14

Active member
I hear what you are saying, my daughter had certain girls in her league that she had bad blood with from years of playing multiple games against (in younger leagues and AAU). It always brought a little something extra to those rivalry games- things could get a little spicy. But- things never got to the point of intentionally hurting someone. We have seen it happen- one girl was known for falling into girl’s knees, another for the hard elbow to the ribs on every possession, one for the “accidental” face smashing on rebounds. The post on twitter with her sisters liking/sharing It, coupled by her dad/coach doing nothing about it makes it pretty clear This is the way this family operates. They were proud of her for doing this, clearly this is not the first time she has behaved violently- just The worst she’s been caught. The Norwalk parents are saints- I wouldn’t have been so magnanimous if it had been my kid.
I can see some bad blood, and rivals, but this was clearly intentional and was meant to send a message. Now was there intent to cause the girl to hit her head on the floor and get a concussion? That's a whole other case. As you said, it's really an indictment on the program, family and player that A. the kid did not even get pulled from the game and B. only a one game suspension. I'm not sure that she should had been suspended for the season, but I'd had thought at least a 3-5 game suspension would had been warranted. Heck, if an official had seen this (which I'm not blaming them) she would had been ejected immediately and sat the next two games by rule I believe. I can't imagine Bellvue has many fans outside their own school.
 

StSebastian

Active member
I would like to hear the argument in court that a wide open layup, unguarded constitutes a "return to competition ". You make a very good point as to opening up potential liability especially if things were to go downhill from here ( I pray not the case) and her became bitter and saught retribution. I am paranoid about such possibilities now you gave me one more s scenerio to consider. I tell my kids all the time, sometimes it costs to be nice or no good deed goes unpunished.
Crazy world we live in where a gesture like this, while very well intended and one that I personally like to see, can end up taking a bad turn... Thankfully nothing happened and the gesture was well received. Just not a risk I personally would have taken as an administrator or coach knowing the landscape of frivolous lawsuits and more importantly, the potential of life threatening activity...

As far as the "return to competition" argument, was the game officially started or was this done prior to the game starting? For the points to count, which I believe they did if I read the articles correctly, the game was officially started and thus would (again with the technicalities I know...) TECHNICALLY she "returned to competition" regardless of how innocuous it may have seemed.

If someone really wanted to be a hole in a donkeys rear, they could make something of it. For the sake of humanity, I hope not!
 

rww

New member
Unfortunately this is not how court cases involving medical situations actually work. A head injury like someone already mentioned is a different animal. Someone with a severe head injury could collapse or even die just walking down the hallway. In most of the cases where I've seen a player at the high school level get a concussion - the doctor does not permit them to return to SCHOOL for several days, let alone walk out onto the basketball court. If that player would have collapsed on the court during those 2 shots she was provided, the parents would have shared ZERO liability in that situation (Think about the person that sued McDonald's because they spilled coffee on themselves and got burned). The parents likely would be suing the school, the coach, and the medical professional that cleared their daughter to enter that game (IF the medical professional was even consulted about this).....Like you said though, I'm sure anyone with any type of sense wouldn't be happy - like the McDonald's situation I referenced, common sense gets thrown out the window in those types of situations...

It stinks - senior night, then tournament games starting just after this incident....but there is no chance she should have been on that court doing anything until she was cleared from concussion protocol. NFHS & OHSAA have zero tolerance when it comes to concussions - in order for that player to have started and gotten those 2 shots, the school would have needed a waiver from OHSAA - and OHSAA would have never granted it.....
Did either/or NFHS - OSHAA weigh in or offer any opinion or judgement on any part of the issue?
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Unfortunately this is not how court cases involving medical situations actually work. A head injury like someone already mentioned is a different animal. Someone with a severe head injury could collapse or even die just walking down the hallway. In most of the cases where I've seen a player at the high school level get a concussion - the doctor does not permit them to return to SCHOOL for several days, let alone walk out onto the basketball court. If that player would have collapsed on the court during those 2 shots she was provided, the parents would have shared ZERO liability in that situation (Think about the person that sued McDonald's because they spilled coffee on themselves and got burned). The parents likely would be suing the school, the coach, and the medical professional that cleared their daughter to enter that game (IF the medical professional was even consulted about this).....Like you said though, I'm sure anyone with any type of sense wouldn't be happy - like the McDonald's situation I referenced, common sense gets thrown out the window in those types of situations...

It stinks - senior night, then tournament games starting just after this incident....but there is no chance she should have been on that court doing anything until she was cleared from concussion protocol. NFHS & OHSAA have zero tolerance when it comes to concussions - in order for that player to have started and gotten those 2 shots, the school would have needed a waiver from OHSAA - and OHSAA would have never granted it.....

Well stated. I see your point. Wonder how OHSAA and even the school would think if this in hindsight? Maybe stronger - clearer language in the manual?
 

CasualFan24

Active member
Well stated. I see your point. Wonder how OHSAA and even the school would think if this in hindsight? Maybe stronger - clearer language in the manual?
Seems like the largest problem in the whole situation was a lack of communication. Coach supposedly didn't know the player was in protocol until right before the game (how is that even possible, did they not have practice between games?????) Then the coach probably made the decision on his own to make an arrangement with the opposing teams coach to get the girl into the game....more than likely there was no communication to administration, medical professionals, parents or anyone that actually mattered in that situation. I'm not burying the coach for this - he probably didn't know the potential harm that could have been caused and was trying to do something extremely nice for his player, I commend him for it, but it's also his job first and foremost to keep his players out of harms way AND he should probably know the rules/requirements when dealing with a concussion if he's going to continue coaching.....

Hopefully nothing comes of this from OHSAA and everyone can move on! Anyone know if this team is still in the tournament or if they've been knocked out yet?
 

USA70PP

Well-known member
...
Hopefully nothing comes of this from OHSAA and everyone can move on! Anyone know if this team is still in the tournament or if they've been knocked out yet?
Yeah, that makes sense. OHSAA dings this coach and team and does nothing to the team and girl that created the situation.
 

rww

New member
Seems like the largest problem in the whole situation was a lack of communication. Coach supposedly didn't know the player was in protocol until right before the game (how is that even possible, did they not have practice between games?????) Then the coach probably made the decision on his own to make an arrangement with the opposing teams coach to get the girl into the game....more than likely there was no communication to administration, medical professionals, parents or anyone that actually mattered in that situation. I'm not burying the coach for this - he probably didn't know the potential harm that could have been caused and was trying to do something extremely nice for his player, I commend him for it, but it's also his job first and foremost to keep his players out of harms way AND he should probably know the rules/requirements when dealing with a concussion if he's going to continue coaching.....

Hopefully nothing comes of this from OHSAA and everyone can move on! Anyone know if this team is still in the tournament or if they've been knocked out yet?
Norwalk (7) - 33
Mansfield Sr. (8) - 43

Bellevue (1) - 89
Galion (11) - 18

Bellevue (1) - 74
Vermilion (10) - 37
 

CasualFan24

Active member
Good heavens the girl was in concussion protocol, not life support. I'm sure there was absolutely no way this girl was going to be in any harm's way, it was a great display of sportsmanship for both teams and a way to honor the girl on senior night.
It wasn't just a sprained ankle either though.....with everything going on with the NFL and all the research done on concussions and the effects they have on the adolescent brain especially....there is a reason concussions are ZERO tolerance. The head coach for sure has to take a concussion certification course prior to being able to coach - and the rules/requirements are very clear in that course....

Also, if we want to get real in depth on concussions, bright lights of the gym and loud cheering fans are probably the first things a doctor would tell you to avoid if you had a concussion, ya know, other than physical activity and/or the game itself.....just saying....
 

Red14

Active member
It wasn't just a sprained ankle either though.....with everything going on with the NFL and all the research done on concussions and the effects they have on the adolescent brain especially....there is a reason concussions are ZERO tolerance. The head coach for sure has to take a concussion certification course prior to being able to coach - and the rules/requirements are very clear in that course....

Also, if we want to get real in depth on concussions, bright lights of the gym and loud cheering fans are probably the first things a doctor would tell you to avoid if you had a concussion, ya know, other than physical activity and/or the game itself.....just saying....
Is there a chance she was in school, taking classes (with lights on), doing normal activities and just hadn't cleared the concussion protocol tests. Again, I'll trust the coach and parents to make this decision - not a hard one. I'm sure if there was any fear for her safety, they would not have done this.
 

mcm.1019

Active member
Seems like the largest problem in the whole situation was a lack of communication. Coach supposedly didn't know the player was in protocol until right before the game (how is that even possible, did they not have practice between games?????) Then the coach probably made the decision on his own to make an arrangement with the opposing teams coach to get the girl into the game....more than likely there was no communication to administration, medical professionals, parents or anyone that actually mattered in that situation. I'm not burying the coach for this - he probably didn't know the potential harm that could have been caused and was trying to do something extremely nice for his player, I commend him for it, but it's also his job first and foremost to keep his players out of harms way AND he should probably know the rules/requirements when dealing with a concussion if he's going to continue coaching.....

Hopefully nothing comes of this from OHSAA and everyone can move on! Anyone know if this team is still in the tournament or if they've been knocked out yet?
not even close to the truth...I'm not going to rehash the story, but if you search on the Norwalk Reflector website you can easily find the story...game was between Norwalk and Lorain Clearview if you want to search.
 

CasualFan24

Active member
not even close to the truth...I'm not going to rehash the story, but if you search on the Norwalk Reflector website you can easily find the story...game was between Norwalk and Lorain Clearview if you want to search.
OK - read the article, the only thing it disproves is that the AD was involved. Nothing else I said was disproved by that article. According to FOX 8s coverage and coaches interview, the head coach for Norwalk didn't know she was in the protocol and that was straight from his own mouth. It also said nothing about consulting OHSAA or her doctor.

Again, I think it was a great act of kindness and sportsmanship - something that certainly should be applauded. But it still doesn't mean they did the correct or most intelligent thing....
 

CasualFan24

Active member
Is there a chance she was in school, taking classes (with lights on), doing normal activities and just hadn't cleared the concussion protocol tests. Again, I'll trust the coach and parents to make this decision - not a hard one. I'm sure if there was any fear for her safety, they would not have done this.
"Dispensing with the traditional opening tip-off, the basketball was immediately given to Ward, who put in a point-blank shot for two points. She was immediately substituted out and changed back into street clothes, wearing sunglasses and a hoodie pulled over her head."

She was apparently in such great shape from the concussion that she needed to wear a hood over her head and sunglasses while in the gym........great act of sportsmanship or not - if we are talking about the players best interests, she shouldn't have been on the court....

Parents can parent however they want......we often see how great :rolleyes: that works out for some kids......
 

Tesoro

Well-known member
I'm amazed that we are having this discussion..totally amazed. Dear God...I'm assuming you think this girl should have laid in bed with a motorcycle helmet on her head all day.
 

CasualFan24

Active member
I'm amazed that we are having this discussion..totally amazed. Dear God...I'm assuming you think this girl should have laid in bed with a motorcycle helmet on her head all day.
Only as long as the room she was in had padded walls too.....just in case! ;)
 

MCGal

Well-known member
It wasn't just a sprained ankle either though.....with everything going on with the NFL and all the research done on concussions and the effects they have on the adolescent brain especially....there is a reason concussions are ZERO tolerance. The head coach for sure has to take a concussion certification course prior to being able to coach - and the rules/requirements are very clear in that course....

Also, if we want to get real in depth on concussions, bright lights of the gym and loud cheering fans are probably the first things a doctor would tell you to avoid if you had a concussion, ya know, other than physical activity and/or the game itself.....just saying....
Good grief you guys just won't let it go. IF she was light sensitive and still having monster headaches, she wouldn't have been in the gym never mind on the floor. The assumption by the keyboard warriors on here that they know more than the coach, trainer, and AD involved is insane.
 

MCGal

Well-known member
"Dispensing with the traditional opening tip-off, the basketball was immediately given to Ward, who put in a point-blank shot for two points. She was immediately substituted out and changed back into street clothes, wearing sunglasses and a hoodie pulled over her head."

She was apparently in such great shape from the concussion that she needed to wear a hood over her head and sunglasses while in the gym........great act of sportsmanship or not - if we are talking about the players best interests, she shouldn't have been on the court....

Parents can parent however they want......we often see how great :rolleyes: that works out for some kids......
Have you considered that it was a really emotional night for her even with getting to score so maybe the hoodie/sunglasses were for other reasons?
 

CasualFan24

Active member
Good grief you guys just won't let it go. IF she was light sensitive and still having monster headaches, she wouldn't have been in the gym never mind on the floor. The assumption by the keyboard warriors on here that they know more than the coach, trainer, and AD involved is insane.
I've said it probably 4 times now in this thread - but hey what's one more time, I THOUGHT IT WAS GREAT FOR THE PLAYER TO GET TO ENTER THE GAME AND PARTICIPATE IN HER SENIOR NIGHT.....I can also look up other translations to that sentence for anyone not quite understanding English.

I never once said I knew what the player was feeling or what her symptoms were, so from that standpoint - I DID NOT/ DO NOT KNOW MORE THAN THOSE INVOLVED. However, I DO know the RULES of the game, and the requirements of coaches, players, administration, medical professionals, etc when it comes to dealing with a concussion. I provided insight on the protocol - and have been giving examples based on articles written, as to why the rules/regulations are what they are and say what they say. And how/why violating those rule/regulations could be a problem both from the violation of rules standpoint and the potential impacts on the players health.

I can't help that people on here are STILL, in 2020, ignorant to the effects of concussions in sports and the extreme effects one can have on children and teens. Everyone who has had the HOT take about it not being that serious - who question the "competition" aspect, or the physicality of what the player did, or who assume you need to be "laying in bed with a motorcycle helmet on" should take, I don't know, maybe 30 seconds and google "post concussion syndrome" or "post concussion death" or "post concussion symptoms" or "effects of a concussion" or "concussion in children" and read the articles about students/people who end up with seizures, loss of basic motor skills, and unfortunately those who passed away after obtaining a concussion.....

But yeah, I guess I'm the bad guy for believing they should have followed the rules that are in place....

Just one question for all those who think it was no big deal and can't believe we are having this discussion - What if that was YOUR daughter? I know with zero uncertainty that my daughters' health would be the first thing on my mind - and there's no chance she'd have been put in that position.....If I was in that position - we'd have walked across the gym floor arm in arm like the rest of the seniors and exited the building after the recognition of the seniors, prior to tipoff....
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Just one question for all those who think it was no big deal and can't believe we are having this discussion - What if that was YOUR daughter? I know with zero uncertainty that my daughters' health would be the first thing on my mind - and there's no chance she'd have been put in that position.....If I was in that position - we'd have walked across the gym floor arm in arm like the rest of the seniors and exited the building after the recognition of the seniors, prior to tipoff....
Been there, done that associated with an internal injury of a child of mine.

We decided, with advice from doctors that our child was at a greater risk riding in the car to their follow-up medical appointments than they were walking onto the floor, being handed the ball, hoisting that ball into the basket (took three tries), and walking off the floor.

The Rule/Law is in place to protect the kids, that we all can agree on...... However, this Rule/Law was written because players were returning to full participation before they were medically ready. Nobody with a lick of true common sense would associate what happened here with full participation.....

.....that is unless they can provide credible research that has ties further catastrophic injury associated with acts such as these.

Sheesh....
 
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StSebastian

Active member
I've said it probably 4 times now in this thread - but hey what's one more time, I THOUGHT IT WAS GREAT FOR THE PLAYER TO GET TO ENTER THE GAME AND PARTICIPATE IN HER SENIOR NIGHT.....I can also look up other translations to that sentence for anyone not quite understanding English.

I never once said I knew what the player was feeling or what her symptoms were, so from that standpoint - I DID NOT/ DO NOT KNOW MORE THAN THOSE INVOLVED. However, I DO know the RULES of the game, and the requirements of coaches, players, administration, medical professionals, etc when it comes to dealing with a concussion. I provided insight on the protocol - and have been giving examples based on articles written, as to why the rules/regulations are what they are and say what they say. And how/why violating those rule/regulations could be a problem both from the violation of rules standpoint and the potential impacts on the players health.

I can't help that people on here are STILL, in 2020, ignorant to the effects of concussions in sports and the extreme effects one can have on children and teens. Everyone who has had the HOT take about it not being that serious - who question the "competition" aspect, or the physicality of what the player did, or who assume you need to be "laying in bed with a motorcycle helmet on" should take, I don't know, maybe 30 seconds and google "post concussion syndrome" or "post concussion death" or "post concussion symptoms" or "effects of a concussion" or "concussion in children" and read the articles about students/people who end up with seizures, loss of basic motor skills, and unfortunately those who passed away after obtaining a concussion.....

But yeah, I guess I'm the bad guy for believing they should have followed the rules that are in place....

Just one question for all those who think it was no big deal and can't believe we are having this discussion - What if that was YOUR daughter? I know with zero uncertainty that my daughters' health would be the first thing on my mind - and there's no chance she'd have been put in that position.....If I was in that position - we'd have walked across the gym floor arm in arm like the rest of the seniors and exited the building after the recognition of the seniors, prior to tipoff....
... But, but, but... my emotions and my feelings... 😭

Well said 👏

Student safety, health, and well being IS and ALWAYS should be THE single greatest factor in ANY and EVERY decision made by school administration. If it is not the foundation for the argument you are making... you are wrong. Not to mention, the return to play protocol for concussions (only injury that has this particular level of concern) is a STATE LAW guided by specifically detailed procedures set forth by the National Federation of High School Associations and adopted by the OHSAA. It doesn't make it an easy decision, but when rules are deliberately ignored that are in place specifically to protect and ensure the safety, health, and well being of a student-athlete, you do so at your own risk and peril. In the context of this situation, and many others like it... is the risk high? Not so much... but that doesn't mean there is not one. And because of that, the decision of the coach, AD, and other school administration to allow this was precarious at its best outcome (thankfully everything worked out for the best) and egregious at its potential worse (what COULD have happened).
 
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