22 percent of millennials say they have “no friends”

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
Today, members of the millennial generation are ages 23 to 38. These ought to be prime years of careers taking off and starting families, before joints really begin to ache. Yet as a recent poll and some corresponding research indicate, there’s something missing for many in this generation: companionship.

A recent poll from YouGov, a polling firm and market research company, found that 30 percent of millennials say they feel lonely. This is the highest percentage of all the generations surveyed.
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nwwarrior09

Well-known member
This is no surprise. People today are too busy, too tuned into technology and a lot of traditional forms of community building are pretty much dead unless you're in a booming city with a bunch of younger transplants. If you get lost in the shuffle and no longer have those high school/college connections in close proximity it's harder to make new connections of equal or greater value.
 

Zunardo

Active member
.... a lot of traditional forms of community building are pretty much dead ....
Remember when bowling leagues were a big thing? Now, not nearly so much. Classic example of dwindling social interaction opportunities.

When I started working for USPS in 1983, I played in three postal softball leagues a week, plus a fourth postal team in an open league. Also played in a postal volleyball league. There were at least three postal bowling leagues, although I didn't have time for them (was already bowling in another league). Also two golf leagues that were popular

That was an outlet for me, as well as a great way to get to know my work colleagues who otherwise might have remained mostly strangers I would see across the room.

Not sure when the volleyball stopped. The last softball league folded in the late 1990's. Golf became an annual memorial tournament. When I retired, they were down to one bowling league, and that had shrunk substantially. I have no idea what the whippersnappers of today do for social outlets, but I imagine it mostly involves texting.
 
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thavoice

Well-known member
Too many people are locked into their devices. Travelled yesterday and so wanted to buy gift cards to pass out to people whom I saw not all dug in playing on their devices. People need to start living in their own moments instead of always trying to besomplace else. Enjoy where you are.
 

nwwarrior09

Well-known member
Remember when bowling leagues were a big thing? Now, not nearly so much. Classic example of dwindling social interaction opportunities.

When I started working for USPS in 1983, I played in three postal softball leagues a week, plus a fourth postal team in an open league. Also played in a postal volleyball league. There were at least three postal bowling leagues, although I didn't have time for them (was already bowling in another league). Also two golf leagues that were popular

That was an outlet for me, as well as a great way to get to know my work colleagues who otherwise might have remained mostly strangers I would see across the room.

Not sure when the volleyball stopped. The last softball league folded in the late 1990's. Golf became an annual memorial tournament. When I retired, they were down to one bowling league, and that had shrunk substantially. I have no idea what the whippersnappers of today do for social outlets, but I imagine it mostly involves texting.
There's actually a book titled "Bowling Alone" that was written by Robert Putnam about declining social capital and community nearly 20 years ago. He originally wrote a shorter essay on the topic way back in the mid-90s. On bowling, he argued that stats indicated that the number of people who at least occasionally did that activity had increased (the time frame was probably 1980-2000), but there seemed to be a sharp decrease in league participants and leagues in general.

The same for a variety of other social and civic groups and organizations, whether it's softball leagues, Lions' Clubs, vet organizations or volunteering, and that (at that time) it seemed that community and social disengagement was resulting in a big drop in civic engagement in politics, voting, etc. I imagine that mainstreaming of things like cable/satellite TV and the internet resulted in more sedentary lives in isolation at home with just family and close friends.

Today, people seem to be some combination of too busy and too engaged in technology/social media for those things. Increasingly it seems like people are working "extra" beyond regular work hours, and with weakening friendships people stay at home and watch Netflix, consume media online, or if they go out to do something, it's by themselves or with maybe one other person. Women seem to be better at maintaining social relationships, but men increasingly seem to be very isolated and distanced socially. This is only going to get worse as the "Z" generation that's always had technology/social media and adults routinize/structure their in-person activities become adults.
 
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