2020 Ohio High School Baseball Coaches Association State Clinic January 16-18 Columbus

Ranger03

New member
The 2020 Ohio High School Baseball Coaches Association State Clinic is January 16-18 in Columbus at the Hyatt Regency and is open to for any coach (youth, HS, College) to attend. Registration for the clinic and hotel can be found on www.ohsbca.org. Below are list of speakers and topics:

THURSDAY, JANUARY 16TH
11:30am- 1:30pm OHSBCA Board Meeting (Marion)
2:00pm - 7:30pm Clinic Registration (Franklin-Hyatt 2nd floor)
3:00pm -10:00pm Vendor Exhibit Hall Open (Delaware/Franklin-Hyatt 2nd floor)
3:00pm - 3:05pm Introduction of Hall of Fame Inductees – Rob Lavengood - OHSBCA Past President (Regency Ballroom)
3:05pm - 3:35pm Hall of Fame Inductee – Tom Neubert – St. Francis de Sales High School (Regency Ballroom)
3:40pm - 4:10pm Hall of Fame Inductee – Marc Lowther – Cuyahoga Heights High School (Regency Ballroom)
4:15pm - 4:45pm Hall of Fame Inductee – Ray Hamilton – Lakota East High School (Regency Ballroom)
4:50pm - 4:55pm Clinic Welcome – Craig Kyle - OHSBCA President – Jonathon Alder High School (Regency Ballroom)
4:55pm - 5:00pm Jeff Swick - PHAALS- Introduction and Promotion (Regency Ballroom)
5:05pm - 5:35pm Matt Englander – Case Western Reserve University “Coaching Matters: How Baseball Prepares For Life”(Regency Ballroom)
5:40pm - 6:25pm Jerry Weinstein – Colorado Rockies “Receiving” (Regency Ballroom)
6:30pm - 7:15pm Tony Vitello – University of Tennessee “Creating Offensive Production” (Regency Ballroom)
7:20pm - 7:35pm Q & A with Matt Englander, Tony Vitello and Jerry Weinstein (Regency Ballroom)
7:40pm - 8:25pm Greg Beals – The Ohio State University “Tools to Drive the Motivated Player and Team” (Regency Ballroom)
8:30pm - 9:15pm Erik Bakich – University of Michigan “Biometric Driven Coaching” (Regency Ballroom)
9:20pm -10:05pm Randy Mazey – West Virginia University Attacking Good Hitters: Strategies To Get Them Out(Regency Ballroom)
10:10pm-10:25pm Q & A with Greg Beals, Erik Bakich and Randy Mazey (Regency Ballroom)
10:30pm-12:30am Clinic Smoker (Sponsored by Celebrate Sports Tour) (Regency Ballroom)

FRIDAY, JANUARY 17TH
8:00am - 9:30am Clinic Registration (Franklin-Hyatt 2nd floor)
8:30am - 6:00pm Vendor Exhibit Hall Open (Delaware/Franklin-Hyatt 2nd floor)
8:00am - 8:30am District Meetings
8:40am - 8:45am Clinic Welcome – John Bakalar - OHSBCA 1st VP – Crestwood High School (Regency Ballroom)
8:45am - 9:25am Jerry Weinstein – Colorado Rockies “New Age Hitting” (Regency Ballroom)
9:30am- 10:10am Fred Corral – University of Missouri - Pitching Plan for Today’s Pitching Pageantry (Regency Ballroom)
10:10am-10:15am Emily Gates – OHSAA (Regency Ballroom)
10:15am-10:55am David Pierce – University of Texas “The Big Picture” (Regency Ballroom)
11:05am-11:35am Mini Clinic #1: (Pick one below to attend)
  • Brian Harrison – Baldwin Wallace “Creating a Hitting Plan” (Hayes)
  • Eric Smith – Youngstown State University “Daily Outfield Drills” (Union AB)
  • Danny Hayden – Miami University "Catching: Taking Care of the Strike Zone" (Taft CD)
  • Kyle Hallock – Bowling Green State University “The Pitching Development Calendar”” (Fairfield)
  • Dean Hansen – The Ohio State University “Developing Speed, Strength, and Mobility in the HS Baseball Athlete” (Union CD)
  • Brian Meyer - Minnesota Twins “Building Infield Playmakers” (Taft AB)
11:45am-12:15pm Mini Clinic #2: (Pick one of the above to attend)
11:55am-12:35pm Scholarship Award Recipients Reception (Regency North Foyer)
12:25pm-12:35pm Hall of Fame Banquet Seating (Regency Ballroom)
12:40pm-12:45pm Hall of Fame Inductee Promenade (Regency Ballroom)
12:45pm- 2:30pm Banquet/Awards/Hall of Fame Induction (Sponsored by Rawlings Sporting Goods) (Regency Ballroom)
2:30pm - 3:30pm Hall of Fame and Past Presidents Reception (Fairfield)
3:30pm - 4:15pm Justin Toole – Cleveland Indians “High Performing Teams” (Regency Ballroom)
4:20pm - 5:05pm Matt Kata – Cleveland Indians “The Infielders Checklist” (Regency Ballroom)
5:10pm - 5:55pm Jeff Duncan – Kent State University “3 Pillars to Building Championship Culture” (Regency Ballroom)
6:00pm - 6:45pm Jordon Banfield – University of Akron "Recruiting and Player Evaluation" (Regency Ballroom)
7:00pm - 8:00pm Hot Stove Social: 2019 State Champion & Poll Champion Coaches (Sponsored by PBR) (Fairfield)
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18TH
9:00am- 9:40am Jim Rickon – Cleveland Indians “Keys to Developing the Complete Hitter” (Delaware AB)
9:45am- 10:25am Evan Agona - Cuyahoga Community College “Daily Drills for Infielders to Maximize Time & Space” (Delaware AB)
10:30am-11:10am Mike Grady – Grady Pitching School “Coaching Pitchers in an Era of Data and Driveline” (Delaware AB)
11:15am-11:55am Bill Gamble – Jackson High School “Investing in Your 401K: Developing Your Youth Program” (Delaware AB)
12:00pm- 2:00pm OHSBCA Board Meeting (Marion)
 
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BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
Must be the event where high school coaches are indoctrinated in the "we must bunt at every opportunity" philosophy. I have never met a high school coach that does not bunt all the time.
 

thePITman

Well-known member
Must be the event where high school coaches are indoctrinated in the "we must bunt at every opportunity" philosophy. I have never met a high school coach that does not bunt all the time.
Don't confuse bunting with bad baseball, though. It's quite the opposite. The best teams can bunt when needed, IMO. Take a look at Jackson when they won the Division I state title a few years ago... bunted more than any team I've ever seen.

I was just talking to some people yesterday about that topic... the rise of the bunt has a lot more to do with the weakening of the bats than anything else, IMO. A dozen years ago when bats were hotter, there was a lot less bunting and a lot more smashing the ball. With weaker bats, small ball is making a comeback.
 
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BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
I think that there is a time and a place. Early in the game is typically not the time but I have not met a high school coach that does not do it all the time. so much for the philosophy of not sacrificing at bats.
 

GCPRO

Well-known member
Numerous factors enter into the why and the when of bunting, however it is a ball put in play that forces the defense to make a play. Putting pressure on a defense is the intention regardless of the situation.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
a play that a good defense makes all the time. That is my problem with it. It is not pro-offensive maneuver, it is a "I hope the other team makes a mistake maneuver". Sort of related to the whole "hit down on the ball" nonsense that some high school coaches still teach.
 

thePITman

Well-known member
a play that a good defense makes all the time. That is my problem with it. It is not pro-offensive maneuver, it is a "I hope the other team makes a mistake maneuver". Sort of related to the whole "hit down on the ball" nonsense that some high school coaches still teach.
Sacrifice bunts are called "sacrifices" for a reason. :) The result of moving one or more baserunners into scoring position (or in a more threatening position if already at second base) also puts pressure on the defense in the at bats to follow, not just during the bunt itself.

Any time you can increase the number of ways a baserunner can score, it is a good thing. The number of ways a baserunner can score from 1st vs 2nd vs 3rd increases dramatically. I've seen many more teams recently bunting runners from first to second, which I understand but have mixed feelings about. But bunting runners from second to third is much more value-added, IMO, and oftentimes a no-brainer (obviously depending on where you are in the lineup, score, inning, etc).
 

fortfan

Well-known member
I'm not a big fan of bunting.

We practice bunting as much as anybody, I would guess. It is still difficult to execute.

If there are no outs and a runner on first who isn't a threat to steal 2nd, ok-bunt him over. (Rather fake bunt and steal)

Runner on 2nd? He can score on most base hits. IMO, unless it's a very close game in the late innings, I don't want to give up an out to get him to 3rd.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
I'm not a big fan of bunting.

We practice bunting as much as anybody, I would guess. It is still difficult to execute.

If there are no outs and a runner on first who isn't a threat to steal 2nd, ok-bunt him over. (Rather fake bunt and steal)

Runner on 2nd? He can score on most base hits. IMO, unless it's a very close game in the late innings, I don't want to give up an out to get him to 3rd.
Our program found its resurgence when they rediscovered bunting. It happened the same time-ish that they went to the BBCOR bats which have very little pop compared to the predecessors. Instead of playing the power game they went to more the small ball and it has worked.

Here is the thing, bunting really is an attitude. If the coaching staff pays token attention to it then the kids wont care either. When we started to bunt/squeeze with two strikes (which has worked a stunningly amazing amount of time) the kids realized this is no BS and put more effort into it early in the count. In working with kids out of the area it was an eye opener, for me and them as well. When they realized they couldn't swing away until they got at least 3 good SACS down in BP they stopped half-assing it. Bunting is all pure attitude and want to, and can be a very effective tool if used properly and I believe also teaches bat control.

Also, do it well and it really is not an easy play to defense for many HS kids, it really isn't, especially when it seems less importance is put on PFP.
I believe putting the defense in motion is a good thing. Just don't bunt the damn thing back to the pitcher. At the HS level it makes more sense than it does in college or MLB.

In Small Ball We Trust.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
This over reliance on bunting in high school baseball is maddening. Makes me glad that the season is only 8 to 10 weeks long depending on the weather. Don't get me wrong, bunting is a skill that should be mastered by every good ball player and for fast players it is a nifty tool. But the ridiculous amount of sacrifice and suicides called by our local high school coaches is ridiculous. Oh well, I only have to sit through one more year. To all the coaches that are on this board, how about establishing a hitting league or put together a hitting team and go to some established hitting leagues.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
BBCOR brought bunting back to the forefront.

It is a very effective tool to use. We were a fairly decent team in the 80 s and 90s and it was in our repertoire but like it is today. When the powers that be instituted the BBCOR standard programs saw offensive production go down.

Kids are bigger and stronger nowadays than when I played but the ball does not fly like it used to.

Coaches, myself included, will use every tool possible to create offense and the bat specs led to this resurgance in small ball. Think it was BESR prior to the change? That standard saw great hitting.

Don't blame the coaches, blame the rules change.

BBCOR is a good move for college, but it sucks offense away from HS.

Another trend I hate is at the youth level. Kids will go out and play 5-7 games in a 2-3 day weekend and all the BP they get is that sort toss, tee in the OF for the games and no INF. They play more games nowadays, but I do not believe they learn how to hit properly oeget enough legit BP reps. We may have played a fraction of the games, but the time at practice during the week and every pregame was essentially a practice.


Off my high horse now.
 
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GCPRO

Well-known member
I personally think bunting is a great offensive tool. My son coaches at the collegiate level and we have had quite a few lengthy discussions regarding its use. I understand those that feel the opposite but have seen far too many successes to change my old mind. LOL
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
Here is why I think bunting is so popular in in Ohio High School baseball: the season and the weather. Let me try to explain. Because of when we start playing and because the time outside is rather limited before we start playing, hitting takes a while to get on track and making plays on a bunt can be very tough in 40 degree weather and drizzling. The other contributing factor is how much time high school coaches are allowed to work with their players and institute their hitting philosophy. Maybe that is good thing because I still hear high school coaches talking about hitting down on the ball. But really, I am confused about when a baseball coach can work with his team. My kid's high school used to have open fields starting in late September through October on Monday and Thursdays. I know of two high schools that have hitting groups in September and pitching groups starting in December. However, my kid's high school coach has some pitching and hitting sessions but he tells the kids he cannot coach but just watch. Most of the time my kid says the coaches sit there and Bs with each other while the kids soft toss, machine hit or maybe throw off the mound. if that is all you can do before tryouts and the season, I guess I would bunt too. But late in the season and when these guys coach summer teams, get rid of the bunting.
 

fortfan

Well-known member
I know of two high schools that have hitting groups in September and pitching groups starting in December. However, my kid's high school coach has some pitching and hitting sessions but he tells the kids he cannot coach but just watch. Most of the time my kid says the coaches sit there and Bs with each other while the kids soft toss, machine hit or maybe throw off the mound. if that is all you can do before tryouts and the season, I guess I would bunt too. But late in the season and when these guys coach summer teams, get rid of the bunting.
In my opinion, the rules for this time of year do suck. We are allowed to coach groups of 4 at one time. No more than 4 players can be present in the building if there is coaching going on. That is in effect until practice starts Feb. 24 I think. A "non-coach' can work players out and I believe that is how some schools circumvent that rule.

And for the record - not one speaker talked about bunting that I know of.
 
Here is why I think bunting is so popular in in Ohio High School baseball: the season and the weather. Let me try to explain. Because of when we start playing and because the time outside is rather limited before we start playing, hitting takes a while to get on track and making plays on a bunt can be very tough in 40 degree weather and drizzling. The other contributing factor is how much time high school coaches are allowed to work with their players and institute their hitting philosophy. Maybe that is good thing because I still hear high school coaches talking about hitting down on the ball. But really, I am confused about when a baseball coach can work with his team. My kid's high school used to have open fields starting in late September through October on Monday and Thursdays. I know of two high schools that have hitting groups in September and pitching groups starting in December. However, my kid's high school coach has some pitching and hitting sessions but he tells the kids he cannot coach but just watch. Most of the time my kid says the coaches sit there and Bs with each other while the kids soft toss, machine hit or maybe throw off the mound. if that is all you can do before tryouts and the season, I guess I would bunt too. But late in the season and when these guys coach summer teams, get rid of the bunting.
You are correct if there are more than 4 kids there as stated before. Coaches are in fact babysitting if they have Open Gyms.
4 man workouts are great in theory until you realize that the only cage a school has in the the gym where they have 4-6 basketball practices a night depending on how many teams the school has. Only open time is after 8 or 9p and keeping them later than 9 or 10 is just out of the question for most schools. Then as a coach you take the hour you get and get as many kids in house as possible. At least they are getting swings in.

If the baseball team has its own space then yes, 4 man workouts are a great thing. Pretty much equal to individuals at the college level.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
I understand. The teams I know all have their own space. We need to build a sugar shack like they have down in Georgia for all their baseball and softball teams
 
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